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Where’s Boris? Foreign secretary slammed over Heathrow no show

Monday 25 June 2018 4:47 pm Where’s Boris? Foreign secretary slammed over Heathrow no show Share whatsapp FCO officials have blamed “security reasons” for the radio silence, but no one appears to know with both transport secretary Chris Grayling and backbencher Jacob Rees-Mogg admitting on radio appearances this morning that they didn’t know.And it has prompted criticism from some within his own party.Read more: MPs gear up for key vote on Heathrow expansionSarah Wollaston, the Tory chair of the Commons health committee, told BBC’s Westminster Hour last night: “I think this would be an opportunity for a colleague like Boris Johnson to actually put his money where his mouth is.“Just being conveniently out of the country I’m afraid won’t wash.” Read more: SNP could refuse to back Heathrow expansion plans and sway Commons vote Great to arrive back in the UK at Luton Airport in time for the match today and to vote against #Heathrow expansion tomorrow. I wouldn’t want to be abroad for either of those. #commitments.— Greg Hands (@GregHands) June 24, 2018 Meanwhile, transport secretary Chris Grayling told the BBC: “What he decided to do on the vote is very much a matter for Boris himself.”The vote is expected to be tight, with a number of other Tories including Justine Greening and Zac Goldsmith likely to rebel. Labour MPs have a free vote, with some like shadow chancellor John McDonnell strongly against the plans.City A.M. reported last week that the 35 SNP MPs – who had previously given Grayling their backing on proposals – are likely to vote against the government today.Privately, sources have indicated they are confident of getting the bill through, although admitted it will be closer-run than they would have liked. whatsapp Catherine Neilan She said voters “might expect him to use this as an opportunity and to resign on a point of principle in order to fulfil that election promise”.Wollaston added: “We’ve seen a series of gaffes from Boris Johnson. I think many of us are wondering why in fact he has been allowed to stay so long.”And in a sideswipe against his fellow Conservative, former trade minister Greg Hands tweeted how pleased he was to be returning to the UK for today’s vote, adding: “I wouldn’t want to be abroad”. More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.org Boris Johnson should resign over his long-held objections to Heathrow expansion, one of his colleagues has said, while otgers admit they’ve no idea where he’s hiding.The foreign secretary is today expected to be out of the country, avoiding this afternoon’s vote on the matter. However it is not clear where, with rumours putting him variously in Luxembourg or somewhere on the continent of Africa. read more

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Tesla temporarily freezes production at California assembly plant

first_imgImpacted staff expected to take holiday time if they have it. Also Read: Tesla temporarily freezes production at California assembly plant Millie Turner The reasons for the freeze are unknown. Tesla, Elon Musk’s electric vehicle company, has told workers it will temporarily freeze parts of production at its assembly plant in California. Thursday 25 February 2021 12:14 pm Tesla temporarily freezes production at California assembly plant Production-line pauses drive revenue losses, which could hit Tesla hard on its aim to increase global vehicle deliveries by over 50 per cent this year. Show Comments ▼ whatsapp Staff are set to be paid for the time off until Sunday, but from then on, they are expected to use holiday time if they have any. whatsapp Volkswagen, Ford Motor and General Motors have all been affected by the semiconductor shortage, forcing a decline in production. CEO Elon Musk has set a goal to reach 20m cars sold by 2030, which coupled with price cuts, has stoked concerns the company is not reaching its ambitious goal. More From Our Partners Bill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.comRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org Share Also Read: Tesla temporarily freezes production at California assembly plant However, the company said last month that it may be temporarily impacted by the global shortage of semiconductors. Workers on a Model 3 production line in the California-based Fremont factory were told their line would be down from Monday until 7 March, according to Bloomberg. Tags: Company Elon Musk Tesla Motorslast_img read more

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The MEP’s view

first_img Share Monday 29 June 2015 12:13 am whatsapp In many ways it was always going to end like this, with the Eurozone and national democracy on a collision course. At the heart of this crisis has been the naivety and dishonesty of enthusiasts for the European project of ever closer union. It was always going to be difficult to deliver on the promises that brought Syriza to power since the risk for other Eurozone countries was no longer economic contagion but political contagion.If the bailout conditions were undermined in Greece, how long before governments came to power in other Eurozone countries with similar demands? The fear was that giving Syriza an inch in Greece might only encourage Podemos in Spain to be at the door asking for a mile.What will happen this week? Well, it is clear that Greece remains in the bailout programme until tomorrow. Pulling the plug on its banks before then would be a disaster. I’ve regularly criticised the EU for applying sticking plaster to open wounds, but removing assistance to Greek banks now would expose that wound and surely signal a messy exit from the euro a few days later.If Greece makes it to this Sunday’s referendum, the Greek people should see it as a binary choice: collectively agree to the rules of the ‘club’ and take the painful medicine the rest of Europe prescribes you, or leave the Eurozone and chart your own course. That is the simple truth. Syed Kamall is Conservative MEP for London whatsapp Express KCS center_img Tags: NULL Show Comments ▼ by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeInvestment GuruRemember Cote De Pablo? Take A Deep Breath Before You See Her NowInvestment GuruMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost Funzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity MirrorEliteSinglesThe Dating Site for Highly-Educated Singles in ScottsdaleEliteSinglesTotal Battle – Tactical Game OnlineThe Most Addictive Strategy Game of 2021Total Battle – Tactical Game OnlineTele Health DaveRemember Pierce Brosnan’s Wife? Take A Deep Breath Before You See What She Looks Like NowTele Health DaveAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic Mirror More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgWhite House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.com The MEP’s view last_img read more

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News / Ocean carriers ‘really kicking us while we are down’, say forwarders

first_img By Mike Wackett 20/11/2020 © Mopic | Ocean carriers are racking up massive profits from the unrelenting spiral of rate hikes and surcharges across virtually all liner services.Today’s Shanghai Containerized Freight Index (SCFI) recorded a further 81-point gain across its tradelane components and a new record reading of 1,938.32, a colossal 150% higher than a year ago.Spot rates to North Europe increased by 9%, to $1,644 per teu – 134% higher than 12 months ago.However, shippers told The Loadstar this week carriers were quoting rates, via e-mail and digital platforms, some three times higher than these for Rotterdam and Antwerp, and “much more” for the UK.The high rates also come with a raft of surcharges and fees that, according to some, is now making the shipments unsustainable.The Loadstar heard this week of two big orders from China to the UK that had been cancelled due to the contract needing to be renegotiated, while others have opted to hold shipments in warehouses until the market cools down.Shippers are incensed that carriers are “taking advantage of their stranglehold on the supply chain” by loading on more fees and surcharges.“They are really kicking us while we are down,” said one forwarder.Another UK forwarder was equally angry with the carriers’ treatment of its customers, but also blamed the country’s container ports for what he considered to be a serious threat to businesses.“For every problem there is a surcharge,” he said. “This massively punishes SMEs already suffering due to mismanagement at Felixstowe and other ports.”And shippers from Asia to the Mediterranean are also suffering spot rate hikes over and above the SCFI reading, which this week increased by 7% to $1,797 per teu – 160% higher than a year ago.On the transpacific, the SCFI rate components for the US west and east coasts were stable again this week: west coast rates edging up $25 to $3,913 per 40ft and the east coast increasing by just $6 per 40ft to $4,682.However, here too carriers are indirectly increasing rates to shippers via premium guarantee fees and surcharges.Nevertheless, the shipping lines on the route could boost their earnings even more if they could speed up the return of equipment to Asia. Jon Monroe of US-based Jon Monroe Consulting, reports that “35% to 45% of bookings are being rejected due to no equipment”.He added: “The shortage of containers in Asia is causing carriers to depart load ports with less than full vessels.”Christoph Baumeister, senior trade manager, Asia/ISC – Europe at Flexport, agreed: “Equipment is becoming rarer and carriers cannot always release containers under premium rates.“Serious port congestion at the US west coast and the UK presents even more of a challenge. Schedule reliability will drop further – the on-time performance of certain loops is already below 40%,” he added.Notwithstanding the current short-term rate spike, which analysts believe could continue until the Chinese new year in February, shippers are bracing themselves for some hefty increases in longer-term contract rates for 2021.During Maersk’s third-quarter earnings presentation this week, CEO Soren Skou confirmed that its contract rates would increase, explaining: “The contract market is always impacted by whatever the spot market is at the time of negotiation.”last_img read more

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He ran marathons and was fit. So why did Covid-19 almost kill him?

first_img By Gabrielle Glaser April 21, 2020 Reprints Josh Fiske, right, runs the 2014 New York City Marathon with his best friend, John Conforti. Courtesy Josh Fiske Gabrielle Glaser is a New Jersey-based journalist and author. One answer is what was happening to Fiske. His body had begun to fight the coronavirus with the immune system’s equivalent of thermonuclear weapons — proteins so powerful they risk annihilating the body they are supposed to protect. This massive over-reaction, known as a cytokine storm, is believed to be a major reason that a growing number of exceedingly fit people find themselves fighting for their lives.Immune cells release cytokines as part of the normal response to infections, but in many Covid-19 patients, this process gets out of hand, leading to inflammation and fluid buildup in the lungs. The storms pose a dilemma for doctors: Prescribe medications that tamp down the immune system at the wrong moment, and the body will be defenseless against the coronavirus or any opportunistic infection that’s taken root. Do nothing, and there’s a good chance the massive attack will shut down the lungs and other vital organs.advertisement About the Author Reprints HealthHe ran marathons and was fit. So why did Covid-19 almost kill him? Tags Coronavirusinfectious diseaserespiratory Gabrielle Glaser A week after testing positive for Covid-19, Joshua Fiske drove himself to a New Jersey hospital with a fever nearing 104 and a blood oxygen level extraordinarily low for an athletic 47-year-old. An X-ray revealed pneumonia in both lungs.He was admitted but his condition worsened: He felt cold enough to shiver under five blankets in one moment, then sweated through his hospital gown the next. He worried he wouldn’t pull through. He called his wife to say he loved her. He called his two sons and asked them to take care of their mother, then tapped out a letter to them on his phone. He wanted them to grow into good, kind men, he told them. Above all, he urged, “Don’t let this event define you.”Among the many mysteries of Covid-19 is why relatively healthy young people suddenly become critically ill — or die.advertisement @GabrielleGlaser Scientists have begun to study how many patients who become critically ill with Covid-19 experience these storms, which were initially seen in some of the earliest patients hospitalized in Wuhan, China. In one study of 53 patients in China, researchers concluded that three particular cytokines were correlated with disease severity and death. (The paper was posted on a preprint server and hasn’t been peer-reviewed.)Fiske with his sons Jason, in red bandanna, and Jared and wife Isabella in Costa Rica in mid-February. Courtesy Josh FiskeThe crucial question of what portion of critically ill patients are vulnerable to cytokine storms — and why — awaits more detailed research, said Randy Cron, a rheumatologist at the Children’s Hospital of Alabama and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “We don’t know the numbers, but among previously healthy people ages 20 to 60 who require hospitalization, a significant number are suffering from cytokine storms in addition to the virus,” Cron told STAT.There are not yet data for the number of patients with cytokine storms who require ICU or ventilator care, Cron said. “But outside the 85-year-old with hypertension or diabetes, if you are that sick, it’s very likely that that’s what you are experiencing,” he said.Fiske was among the last people anybody would have expected to become seriously ill. A Livingston, N.J., urologist, he took up running seven years ago at the age of 40. Since then, he has completed the New York City marathon, and six half marathons from Philadelphia to Brooklyn, and he was running 16 to 20 miles a week.On March 16, after a day in the operating room, Fiske spiked a fever of 101. He’d been zealous about wearing personal protection equipment, and was shedding his scrubs in the garage and showering in the basement for weeks, but he knew the risks. Because he was a doctor, he was able to get tested for the virus at the hospital where he worked, Overlook Medical Center in Summit.He felt OK at first, and stayed in his basement. He advised patients and talked to his wife and high-school age sons by FaceTime. His friend and colleague, an infectious disease specialist named Meher Sultana, prescribed him the antibiotic Zithromax and the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, an unproven drug combination that has been used to help fight the virus.But despite regular Tylenol, Fiske’s fever persisted, and Sultana and his dad, Steven, a gastroenterologist, didn’t like how he looked. On March 23, he went to the hospital.His oxygen level was 91 percent, extraordinarily low for someone who was in such good shape. And although his lungs didn’t hurt, an X-ray revealed the double pneumonia. He went quickly to an isolated room with a sliver of a window from which a nurse, Kasey Welch, could monitor him from so she wouldn’t have to change her PPE every time she left his room. They, too, began to FaceTime.Sultana prescribed intravenous fluids, Tylenol, and vitamin C, which did not help. He began to doubt he would survive, but his wife, Isabella, remained optimistic, summoning the memory of her Jewish grandmother, who’d survived the Holocaust in Poland by hiding in the woods with her sister and Isabella’s father. “Some people pray to God, I prayed to my grandmother,” she said.Still, things were not looking good. It hurt to talk, and he labored even to shift positions in bed.“He just wasn’t getting better, and he was starting to have a toxic look,” Sultana said. “I was getting very concerned about the possibility of permanent harm to his lungs.”On March 25, she and Fiske’s father discussed the possibility of moving Josh to the intensive care unit and putting him on a ventilator, but that posed a separate array of dangers. The machines, while sometimes life-saving, can trigger a cascade of inflammation that leads to organ damage. Sultana found herself in the same position as doctors from China to Italy, from Spain to Argentina: fighting a virus that had been spreading in people for only for several months, and about which hardly anything was known. There was scant scientific literature to consult, and no playbook to follow.Some doctors were discussing the possibility that many otherwise robust patients were experiencing cytokine storms. One key sign of that was the body’s levels of ferritin, a protein in the body that binds to iron.Between admission on March 23 and the following day, Fiske’s ferritin skyrocketed from 1,712 to 4,316 micrograms per liter, more than 10 times the normal amount. His level of C-reactive protein, another indicator of inflammation and potential cytokine storm, was 15 times the normal reading.Sultana was running out of options, and she had to act quickly. She researched the anecdotal reports on treatments with potential against the coronavirus. One was a powerful anti-inflammatory drug often used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease in which the immune system also goes into overdrive, attacking the body. She reasoned that Fiske might respond to this drug, called Actemra, which inhibits a particular cytokine called IL-6. Following promising results in China when the drug was used off-label in Covid-19 patients, the FDA had approved its use in U.S. clinical trials in March. (Reports from Italy using a similar drug, Kezvara, showed similar outcomes; it is now in global clinical trials.)None of this is how medicine is supposed to be practiced in the data-centric 21st century, but Sultana and her colleagues across the world have found themselves flinging any plausible weapon at the virus.“I couldn’t even lie to him and say, ‘You’re going to be OK,’” Sultana said.Fiske’s father, 72, relied on more cinematic language to describe how he felt about the possibility he might lose his son. “I don’t panic easily,” Steven Fiske said. “But I was sad and scared for the first time in my medical career. I had to face the fact that medicine might not save my own son, who was another doctor.”“This virus,” Steven Fiske said, “is a combination of ‘Alien,’ ‘The Day the Earth Stood Still,’ ‘The Andromeda Strain,’ and ‘Apocalypse Now.’”On the morning of March 26, with Fiske’s fever still near 104, Welch gave him the infusion of Actemra. Within two hours, his fever dropped to 99 degrees and his oxygen levels returned to near normal.It appeared the drug had worked. “You’re going to be fine,” Sultana reassured him by FaceTime.Fiske stayed in isolation for four more days, improving daily and taking his own vitals so the nurses wouldn’t need to use more PPE. On March 30, Welch wheeled Fiske out of his room and into the lobby, where Isabella was waiting. For the first time, she allowed herself to cry.He spent the next week in his basement, video-consulting with patients. On April 6, after 20 days without touching another person, he climbed the stairs and rejoined his wife and sons, ages 17 and 15.Fiske has slowly resumed exercising, completing three 10-minute miles and a few sessions on his exercise bicycle. And last week, he returned to the office for the first time in a month. He is happy to be seeing patients in person again.Soon, he is scheduled to return, as a surgeon, to the hospital where he was so recently treated. His experiences have shifted his perspective.“I’ve never been nervous walking into a hospital before,” Fiske said. “I fought a war, and I’m going back to the same battlefield.”last_img read more

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Readout of Oval Office Meeting with Bipartisan, Bicameral Members of Congress

first_imgReadout of Oval Office Meeting with Bipartisan, Bicameral Members of Congress The White HouseToday, President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris hosted a bipartisan, bicameral group of Members of Congress in the Oval Office to discuss the critical need to invest in modern and resilient infrastructure nationwide.The President and Vice President shared their vision in the American Jobs Plan to create millions of good jobs, rebuild our country’s infrastructure, and position the United States to out-compete China. The President and Members of Congress had a good exchange of ideas, and the President asked for their feedback and follow-up on proposals discussed in the meeting, while underscoring that inaction is not an option.Meeting attendees represented Congressional committees of jurisdiction including the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, the Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Committee, the House Appropriations Committee, and the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.The President met last month with a bipartisan group of members from the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and leaders of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and intends to continue to engage with Members of Congress and key stakeholders throughout the month. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, america, american, China, commerce, Congress, environment, Forestry, Government, house, infrastructure, jobs, nutrition, President, science, Senate, United States, White Houselast_img read more

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Airport Runway to be chopped at both ends

first_imgHomeNewsAirportAirport Runway to be chopped at both ends May. 26, 2017 at 7:10 amAirportNewsAirport Runway to be chopped at both endsGuest Author4 years agoairportcity councilFAANewsSanta MonicaSanta Monica Airportsanta monica citysmo The City Council green-lit plans to shorten the runway at Santa Monica Airport Wednesday by removing over 700 feet of take off and landing space at both ends.Construction, tentatively scheduled to begin this fall, may require the airport to completely close for three to seven days, according to a report from engineering consultants at AECOM, while the rest of restriping will be done overnight. Crews will repair the runway, relocate lights and repaint.The shorter runway will effectively shut down business jet charters at SMO, according to a report from airport planning firm Coffman Associates. However, most personal and corporate jets will still be able to fly out of the airport. Overall, the shortened runway will reduce jet operations by 44 percent, from around 16,300 flights per year to 9,000 with an annual increase in traffic between five to ten percent.“The new runway is going to be FAA compliant for the first time,” Senior Airport Advisor Nelson Hernandez said in an interview with the Daily Press. Hernandez said the existing 5,000-foot runway did not have sufficient runway protection zones, with 141 houses in the RPZ. The new runway design reduces the number of homes to 25.“That’s over a hundred fewer families who are in the danger zone,” Hernandez said.Hernandez expects construction will be completed by the end of the year. Because the existing runway will be reutilized, the City says the project is exempt from review under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).Despite an outcry from neighbors and a recommendation from the Airport Commission, immediate construction will not include removing the excess 1,500 feet of asphalt no longer in use by the airport.“If all you are able to achieve by the end of this year is a painting of a line on the runway then I feel you ought to be ashamed of yourself for failing the people who have made it clear they want this airport closed,” Gavin Scott, a Santa Monica resident whose home is currently in the RPZ, told the City Council during a special meeting.Scott says about twelve airplanes fly directly over his house every day. He says each time the rumbling of overhead engines is jarring.“It’s like someone ripping your brain. It is tearing. You cannot speak. The windows rattle. Your children cannot play in the garden. It is as if the jet is coming through your garden. Again and again and again every day.”The City Council directed staff to come back to them in the future with options to remove the excess asphalt, but stipulated it will be a separate project. Hernandez says completing the construction and design in phases will help neighbors get immediate relief from air traffic and noise. Deviations from the newly striped runway onto the excess pavement would violate FAA regulations, according to Hernandez who says the City is looking into video cameras for enforcement.“The yellow chevrons will make the airport a 3,500 foot runway and that’s what counts,” Hernandez said. He expects to be back before the Council with additional plans in August.The City is currently dealing with two lawsuits that seek to overturn the consent decree with the FAA that allows Santa Monica to shorten the runway and eventually close it for good in 2028. In February, the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) along with several other business and aviation groups petitioned the U.S. Court of Appeals to review the agreement. Three Circuit Court judges recently denied the NBAA’s motion to halt all construction until the court can review the settlement.Other airport activists point out the City is losing critical infrastructure in the case of a major emergency by shortening the runway and eventually closing SMO.“Shortening the runway by any distance leaves pilots fewer options in the case of an emergency,” said David Hopkins, vice president of the Santa Monica Airport Association. “Choosing to shorten the runway is clearly a political move which will have negative impacts on safety at the airport.”Representatives from the offices of Los Angeles City Councilmember Mike Bonin and Congresswoman Karen Bass complained SMO also effects their constituents. City staff did not publicly present a runway reconfiguration that would have moved the landing strip west, away from Los Angeles neighborhoods.“SMO has long disproportionately impacted the City of LA residents through what I think is a concerted effort to shift noise and air pollution away from the City of Santa Monica,” said Jeff Thomas, a representative from Councilmember Bonin’s office. [email protected] :airportcity councilFAANewsSanta MonicaSanta Monica Airportsanta monica citysmoshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentTelevision Series ReviewPolice arrest barricaded suspectYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall11 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson22 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter22 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor22 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press22 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press22 hours agolast_img read more

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China urges fair play as US steps-up Huawei campaign

first_img China smartphone shipments grow Chris Donkin ChinaHuaweiUS Author Previous ArticleMobile Mix: EE scores 5G winner at WembleyNext ArticleApple, Samsung poised for Azerbaijan payment move AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 23 NOV 2018 Related HomeAsiaNews China urges fair play as US steps-up Huawei campaigncenter_img Tags Huawei founder urges shift to software China’s foreign ministry called for a fair commercial environment for its companies, Reuters reported, following fresh reports claiming US officials were trying to persuade a number of countries to ban Huawei equipment.The Wall Street Journal was among the publications reporting US government officials had contacted “friendly” countries where Huawei equipment was in use to highlight perceived security risks. Markets targeted include Germany, Italy and Japan.One of the newspaper’s sources said nations banning China-made equipment could receive financial support from the US related to telecoms infrastructure.Rumours of the US’s attempts to persuade other countries to avoid using Huawei are nothing new, with numerous reports appearing since the US banned government agencies and contractors from using ZTE and Huawei equipment in August.Following its US ban, Huawei warned authorities in the country its absence would increase prices and slow the rollout of 5G services. It has also highlighted several times it had met national security guidance in Germany, Spain, Italy, the UK, Canada and New Zealand.At the company’s MBBF event earlier this week, Huawei said it had already signed 22 contracts for 5G equipment across the world and showcased partnerships with a number of operators including BT EE, Telefonica, Vodafone and Telecom Italia.In addition to bans on Huawei and ZTE equipment, the US has been hostile to China-based companies across several industries, with the two countries at loggerheads over trade for months. Subscribe to our daily newsletter Back Asia Chris joined the Mobile World Live team in November 2016 having previously worked at a number of UK media outlets including Trinity Mirror, The Press Association and UK telecoms publication Mobile News. After spending 10 years in journalism, he moved… Read more India to shun China vendors in 5G trialslast_img read more

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Traditions and Family in Full Bloom

first_imgPlenty has changed since 1908.For example, you could be reading this on your smartphone or computer, but that was the year the first long-distance radio message was sent, emanating from the Eiffel Tower.Teddy Roosevelt sat in the White House, Oklahoma’s star was added to the flag, and William Durant founded the company that would eventually become General Motors. It was also the year that greenhouses were built on what were then the outskirts of Kalispell. A flower shop was added in 1934, and Woodland Floral has occupied the space on Sixth Avenue East ever since.But for Fay and Wes Wolf, who bought the shop from the original owner’s granddaughter in 1979, it’s what hasn’t changed in the last 108 years that matters.“The reasons for flowers haven’t changed all that much,” Fay Wolf said. “It’s a business that is very enjoyable because we bring the joy of flowers into someone’s life.”Fay, whose favorite flower is the spicy-scented stock flower, is the matriarch of what has become a family floral business, having sold it to her youngest daughter, Penny Kiger, in 2007. Penny’s daughters, Taylor and Jordan Kiger, also work in the shop. The family has been selling floral arrangements long enough to have prepared the flowers for weddings, then for the first babies resulting from those weddings, and then for the weddings resulting from those same babies growing up.And last week, the week before Valentine’s Day, proved a busy one for the shop. The phone rang with consistency, flowers and cards were arranged quickly and expertly, and Troubadour, the floral shop’s resident canine, sought scratches from customers.It is, for all intents and purposes, a family business. When Jordan and Taylor were each born, they were placed in boxes filled with soft, pleasant greenery. Penny and Fay remember customers walking in to the back office, picking up whichever baby was there, and only then going back their shopping in the store.“It’s a good, wholesome atmosphere to raise a family,” Fay said.Fay has stayed on working at the store despite not owning it; she said retirement might not suit her very well, and she enjoys the lively environment there. Having been in the business for nearly 40 years, the heart of it may be the same, but there are some changes.For instance, e-business is a huge part of their customer base. And with so many online stores selling flowers, Woodland Floral has managed to keep its spot with customers because of the personal service. If an Internet order doesn’t ship properly, or is incorrect, the customer may have to deal with it through an online form or digital customer service, Fay noted. But all they have to do at Woodland Floral is call and speak to a human being to get the matter cleared up.“We do a lot of online business,” Fay said.As the current owner, Penny – favorite flower: sunflower – has considerable experience in the floral world. She went to the University of Montana, worked in Portland, and had a job in the wholesale floral business in Spokane before coming back to take over the shop.She’s the fastest in the store when it comes to putting arrangements together, a considerable skill for when those emergency “I have a funeral in an hour and no flowers” calls come in. It’s a natural skill, she said. “I was 10 when mom and dad bought this place,” Penny said.In the few moment between answering the phone or building orders, Fay, Penny, Jordan, and Taylor – favorite flower: circus roses and red tulips – linger in the store’s office, discussing the impending birth of Taylor’s son and Jordan’s upcoming departure to the U.S. Air Force.Having graduated from Flathead High School last year and not having the patience or desire to stand still long enough to craft an arrangement, Jordan, whose favorite flower is the Gerbera daisy, is running deliveries until she leaves for boot camp.It’s been work, but it’s also familiar and comfortable.“It’s been nice to be with family,” she said.For more information on Woodland Floral, visit www.woodlandfloralkalispell.com. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

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23 Covid related deaths and 921 cases confirmed in Republic

first_img Pinterest 23 Covid related deaths and 921 cases confirmed in Republic Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook An additional 23 Covid related deaths have been confirmed in the Republic this evening.921 cases have also been reported, 9 of them in Donegal.The 14 day incidence rate for Donegal currently stands at 233.1 cases per 100,000 of the population.959 people are currently being treated in hospital for the virus, 173 patients are in ICU. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp Google+ Previous articleASTI working to ‘break the impasse’ with GovernmentNext articleTaoiseach will not travel to Washington for St Patrick’s Day News Highland center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook By News Highland – February 12, 2021 Homepage BannerNews Twitter Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA DL Debate – 24/05/21 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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