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MTN appoints another ex-Vodafone exec

first_img Operators back Qualcomm role in open RAN path AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 07 DEC 2016 Las operadoras respaldan el papel de Qualcomm en la RAN abierta Vodafone, Safaricom beat MTN to Ethiopia licence Previous ArticleOnyx to build sub-$30 African smartphoneNext ArticleSamsung picks up win in latest round of Apple legal spat Kavit joined Mobile World Live in May 2015 as Content Editor. He started his journalism career at the Press Association before joining Euromoney’s graduate scheme in April 2010. Read More >> Read more Author Tags Home MTN appoints another ex-Vodafone exec Kavit Majithia MTNVodafone MTN’s senior management shake-up continued with the appointment of Jens Schulte Bockum (pictured), former CEO of Vodafone Germany, as its new group chief operating officer, along with two other high-level hires.The African group’s incoming president and CEO, Rob Shuter, who is set to take the helm in March next year, also has a Vodafone Group background, where he served as head of its European cluster.Bockum, who headed the German unit between 2012 and 2015, will assume the MTN position effective 16 January, succeeding Jyoti Desai, who is retiring.Meanwhile, Oliver Fortuin, the current CEO of BT Global Services Sub Saharan Africa, will assume the position of executive head of business enterprise from 1 March 2017, with responsibility for developing and selling enterprise products for multinationals across Africa.Finally, Bernice Samuels has been named as group executive of marketing. She re-joins the company after previously serving as chief marketing officer for MTN in South Africa, before leaving for a similar role at First National Bank and then joining brewer SABMiller.In a statement, Phuthuma Nhleko, executive chairman of MTN, said the appointments were part of large scale transformational and operational review process.The company has fallen on hard times recently, after agreeing to pay a fine of NGN330 billion ($1.08 billion) for failing to cut off unregistered SIM cards in Nigeria.It is also facing a parliamentary investigation into whether it unlawfully repatriated $14 billion in funds from the same country between 2006 and 2016.Along with today’s three new appointments and incoming chief Shuter, MTN also hired Ralph Mupita in October as its new CFO and executive director. Relatedlast_img read more

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Predict Ability

first_imgLast week, the PGA of America issued some propaganda that perfectly exemplified the recent struggles of the U.S. Ryder Cup team – even if it was clearly unintentional. The organization began circulating movie-type posters featuring captain Tom Watson and the names of his assistants and 12-man roster, hailing them as “The Redeem Team.” Nice thought, but just like so many other well intentioned ideas for the team over the past decade-and-half, something was destined to go wrong. And there it was, over in the bottom right corner of the poster. Continuing with the movie theme, the Ryder Cup team was rated “Extreme Drama” – and shortened to “ED.” All that was missing was a tagline: “If your match lasts longer than four hours, consult your physician.” Here’s guessing the 65-year-old Watson didn’t get too excited about that one. And here are five more bold predictions entering this year’s edition of the Ryder Cup. 1. Tiger Woods’ absence will mean the U.S. team wins – or maybe loses. Those who regularly pray at the altar of Tiger Woods Is The Worst Person Ever have readily kept this statistic handy for daily message board comments in caps lock, oozing with vitriol: Since the turn of the century, the U.S. has only won one Ryder Cup – and that was the only one that didn’t include Woods. The unsubtle points here? Tiger is a me-first guy who couldn’t care less about the team; he’d rather hang with his buddies in Europe’s team room; he chokes in big-time competitions and – quite possibly – he hates America. Just because none of those things are true doesn’t keep people from using these assumptions to back their own story. OK, so Tiger’s 13-17-3 overall record isn’t exactly the stuff of Billy Casper or Lanny Wadkins. You know who else has struggled for the U.S. side? Everybody. I suppose it’s human nature to want to place blame on a single individual for a culture of losing, but Tiger couldn’t have done this alone. This isn’t the NBA. His teammates can’t stand around setting picks and hope he puts up a ton of points and sinks the game-winner for good measure. Woods won’t play this week. If the guys in red, white and blue rekindle the magic of 2008, it will once again send the truthers scurrying to their message boards to connect some dots that shouldn’t be connected. And if they lose again, he’ll somehow be blamed for returning from injury too soon during the summer, getting hurt again, taking himself out of consideration for the Ryder Cup and – yes – screwing over his country. Talk about your lose-lose, huh? The simple fact is, the U.S. team can win with Tiger or without him, and it can lose with or without him. That might not be enough of a scolding hot take in today’s sports parlance, but it’s the truth. His absence from this year’s festivities won’t mean the team will win any more than his presence would have meant it would lose.  2. Ian Poulter’s eyes will remain inside his skull this time. First things first: I’m of the belief that even if Poulter finished DFL at the Lake Nona member-member this summer, he locked up a spot on Europe’s team two years ago. No questions asked, no looking back. BUT … I’m still having a hard time buying the narrative that just because Poulter looked like Seve Ballesteros’ spiky-haired second coming at Medinah, he’s going to replicate those magic moments at Gleneagles, too. Poulter played as if he’d sold his soul to Samuel Ryder last time, his eyes bulging further out of his skull with each birdie celebration. But that doesn’t mean he’ll do it again. That doesn’t mean every putt will drop at this one. That doesn’t mean he’s automatic for five points. It doesn’t mean anything, really. What surprises me the most is that it seems like people are fully expecting this. Everyone appears so stuck on the idea that Poulter can simply show up at the Ryder Cup and dominate that they’re forgetting his only top-10s of the year have come in China and Memphis. They’re overlooking that he’s slipped so far in the world ranking that he’s behind Kevin Na. They’re thinking with their memories instead of applying the most logistical strategy possible to analyze upcoming competitions. Past performance is rarely a predictor of future results. Just think of the pressure Poulter will be under: He’s playing some of the worst golf of his professional career and he’s being expected to win every match he plays. That’s a dangerous combination. It’s also one that is easy to see not having a happy ending. If that’s the case, expect the golf world to go into collective shock. When Poulter fails to make everything he looks at on the greens, when his previously bugged-out eyes are being rubbed in disbelief because the birdies are tougher to come by, everyone will insist they didn’t see it coming because it didn’t happen last time. That’s a poor excuse, though, for just failing to see what he’s been doing lately. 3. Patrick Reed is going to play better than everyone – except Reed – thinks People can’t stand Reed. And when I say people, I mostly mean those who don’t know much about him and couldn’t pick him out of a lineup, but remember his “top-five” comment after winning at Doral and take personal offense to a golfer believing in his own abilities. But there might be small factions of people who can’t stand Reed that also have to share a team room with him this week. It’s little secret that he isn’t exactly the most popular guy on Tour. As one player whispered recently, “The next time he eats with us in player dining will be the first time.” Now, we can sit at the local 19th hole for hours and argue whether being an individualistic guy in an individual sport should really be perceived as a negative, but it’s pretty obvious that this is a player with a major chip on his shoulder who prides himself in proving people wrong. Well, guess what? If I was building my very own successful Ryder Cup prototype, this exact personality trait might be the first thing I downloaded into the microchip in his cerebral cortex. Reed is a fiery dude who will have absolutely no problem laughing when the European supporters cheer a poor shot and gesticulating toward them when he hits a good one. He’ll be unlike most competitors who have trouble removing the 51-weeks-a-year of “gentlemanliness” from their Ryder Cup emotions. That won’t be a problem for Reed. He doesn’t care what people think of him. The irony of that mentality? Employing that exact approach to ruffle feathers and play great golf at Gleneagles might very well endear him to American fans who months ago wrote him off as a cocky kid who needs to know his place. It will just go to prove that attitude is a wonderful thing to have – as long as it’s on your team. 4. Lance Bennett will provide the U.S. team with an inspirational rallying cry. Back in 2006, Darren Clarke served as the heart of the European side, earning three emotion-filled points in the wake of his wife’s death. Two years ago, captain Jose Maria Olazabal invoked the memory of Seve Ballesteros so often that he was in the forefront of each player’s thoughts throughout the week, both on and off the course. A team doesn’t have to overcome death in order to claim victory, but it has proven to unify players in the team room, bringing a group of individuals closer together for the good of the cause. Bennett, the longtime caddie for Matt Kuchar, will be making his return to the bag at Gleneagles. On Aug. 27, his wife, Angela, passed away suddenly. Since then, there’s been an outpouring of support – not only from his fellow loopers, but from players, as well. That support certainly hasn’t been limited to players on this team and not even just Americans, but having Bennett around should provide an extra jolt of inspiration. I know what you’re probably thinking: These guys shouldn’t need it. Competing for their country should be inspiration enough. They shouldn’t need the death of a caddie’s wife to make them hungrier to play inspired golf. The whole situation is analogous to the “Think Globally, Act Locally” campaign. Players can’t see millions of Americans huddled around their TV screens rooting them on. They can’t tangibly feel how much this would mean to a nation that couldn’t care less how many Presidents Cup titles it’s won. But they can look into Bennett’s eyes and understand what it would mean to him – and what it would mean to his family. There’s no telling the importance that type of impact that could have. Many of the team’s caddies got together a few weeks ago in Denver. When the subject of Bennett came up, they all talked about wanting to carry him around on their shoulders after a U.S. victory. There’s little doubt some of the players would be right there with them, propping up a likeable man who could use a few smiles these days. 5. If you’re expecting a blowout, go watch the Presidents Cup. Since these are bold predictions and the U.S. team is a lowly underdog and – full disclosure – I’m an American-born citizen, this is probably the part where I’m supposed to go full Lee Corso. You know, slip under the desk for a minute, and then emerge in patriotic regalia topped by an Uncle Sam chin beard and top hat while orchestrating the crowd into a hastily contrived version of “The Star Spangled Banner.” Not so fast, my friends. Despite my birthplace allegiances, when it comes to international team competitions, I’m only a fan of the law of averages. That’s why this missive from former assistant captain Paul Goydos, as part of his keynote address during the recent U.S. Senior Amateur and reported by Sports Illustrated’s Gary Van Sickle, rings so true. “The Ryder Cup is basically a coin toss,” Goydos told the crowd. “If I tossed a coin 10 times and it came up heads seven times, I wouldn’t immediately think that coin is defective.” This should come as good news to a U.S. roster which has been accused of being defective pretty frequently over the years. And really, it’s being accused of this before the first shot is even struck this week. Phil Mickelson gave up on the FedEx Cup. Jim Furyk can’t close on Sundays. Hunter Mahan and Webb Simpson are no Billy Horschel and Chris Kirk. Pessimism has reigned supreme in recent weeks. What I haven’t heard – and again, call it an American bias if you will – is similar worry over the state of the European team. Martin Kaymer has looked eminently mediocre since the U.S. Open. Lee Westwood has looked that way since the last Ryder Cup. Stephen Gallacher and Jamie Donaldson are unproven on this stage. Victor Dubuisson is a wildcard in every sense of the word. So, why is Europe considered such a heavy favorite? Beats me. I think it’s some combination of the fact that Rory McIlroy looked unbeatable for a month, Ian Poulter and Sergio Garcia have looked unbeatable in this competition before, and they’re playing a home game. But those things should hardly spell doom and gloom for their counterparts. Think about it: For years, the American side was a prohibitive favorite “on paper” and yet those plucky Europeans would look like the dominant team once it started. There are a few logical conclusions here. One is that it’s brutally difficult to play with a target on your back, especially on home turf. The other is that a coin which lands on heads seven times out of 10 is likely to come up tails at some point. This will be that point. Even though they’re not supposed to win, even though Europe is the favorite and the U.S. is without some prominent potential team members, even though pessimism has reigned throughout the 50 states, this column is about bold predictions, so here it comes: The U.S. will win the Ryder Cup. Somebody pass me that Uncle Sam top hat.last_img read more

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Local authors coming to Peebles Library

first_img Powered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay Mama’s Deviled EggsNOW PLAYINGBest Carrot Cake EverNOW PLAYINGApple Pie Bites With Caramel SauceNOW PLAYINGHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersNOW PLAYINGHomemade Caramel SauceNOW PLAYING5 Easy and Delicious Crock Pot Meatball Appetizer RecipesNOW PLAYINGApple Pie BitesNOW PLAYINGOld Fashioned Soft and Buttery Yeast RollsNOW PLAYINGCream Cheese Cake Mix CookiesNOW PLAYINGHow to Slice & Mince Vegetables Like a ProNOW PLAYINGPumpkin Cream Cheese BarsNOW PLAYINGHow to Knead DoughNOW PLAYINGHow to Use a Meat ThermometerNOW PLAYINGSlow Cooker/Crock Pot HintsNOW PLAYINGHow to Quarter a ChickenNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Garbage DisposalsNOW PLAYINGHow to Clean Stainless Steel SinksNOW PLAYINGHow to Cook Scrambled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Peel Hard Boiled EggsNOW PLAYINGHow to Chill a Drink in 2 MinutesNOW PLAYINGHow to Chop an Onion PerfectlyNOW PLAYINGPerfect Bacon Every TimeNOW PLAYINGSweet Alabama PecanbreadNOW PLAYINGParmesan Baked Pork ChopsNOW PLAYINGPrime Rib Roast Au Jus Perfect Every Time! No FailNOW PLAYING Arrow Left #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Arrow right #1 Icon Created with Sketch. Top Searches Top Searches WinchesterSenior ProfileMinti Smiling faces at the Manchester Library during a Summer Reading Program event. PreviousBook donation honors Virginia Rose RodgersNextANNOUNCEMENTS Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterThis Weird Method Can Restore Your Vision Naturally (Watch)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Local authors coming to Peebles LibraryJune 24, 2015Peoples DefenderNews0center_img HomeNewsLocal authors coming to Peebles Library On Saturday, June 27 from 1-4 p.m., fourteen local authors will participate in a Local Author Book Fest at the Peebles Library. Stop by to meet published authors with Adams County ties, visit in person, and learn more about their stories. Signed copies of their books will be available for sale. Visiting authors will include Serena Miller, Derek Miller, Kay Stockham, Michael Hall, Jennifer Ogden, John Simon, Paula Wright, Carol Cartaino, Saundra Crum Akers, Teresa Slack, Bill Ryan, Gianetta Palmer, Tessy Baker, and Pollyanna Covert. They have published dozens of books ranging from humor to cook books, children’s stories to poetry, Amish inspirational fiction to supernatural adventures. This event is sponsored by the Peebles Magazine Club.Also on Saturday, June 27, come to a Summer Mini Comic Con at the West Union Library from noon-4 p.m. Dress up as your favorite superhero or science fiction character to enter our Costume Contest. We’ll give away a door prize including a GameStop gift card, and the first 50 visitors can pick up a free classic comic book title. Stop by our X-box 360 gaming station to test your gaming skills with your friends. Catch an episode of classic superhero cartoons. We’ll have superhero-themed face painting for younger visitors. Tables will be available for role playing groups. Everyone is welcome to attend this free, family-friendly Comic Con on the lawn behind the West Union Library. For more information, call 937-544-2591.The Summer Reading program continues with weekly events for kids, teens, and adults at each library.On Thursday, June 25, be amazed by the Super Magician John Louis and his assistant, the wizard rabbit Snowball. John Louis will present his magic show at the Peebles Library at 1:30 p.m., and at the North Adams Library at 4 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend this fun event.Young children can join Tara at the West Union Library on Thursday, June 25 at 10:30 a.m. to create their own superhero capes. At 11:30 a.m., teens can join Tara to create a group painting project that will serve as a backdrop for our superhero photo shoot.On Monday, June 29 at 1 p.m., young children are invited to join Deborah at the Manchester Library to create your own superhero costume. Teens, come to the Manchester Library on Monday at 3:30 p.m. for a Pizza Party, and don’t forget to wear the superhero mask you created two weeks ago. On Monday at 3 p.m. at the Peebles Library, learn how to “Eat Like a Superhero” during the Family Nutrition Program. Marsha McCormick will share tips for eating for health, and how you can support your family with a healthy diet while shopping on a budget.On Tuesday, June 30 at 3 p.m., come to the North Adams Library to meet our Community Heroes from the Fire Department, Life Squad, and Fire Department. Learn a little about their jobs, and how they help keep our community safe. All ages are welcome to attend.On Wednesday, July 1 at noon, adults are invited to the Manchester Library to learn more about hidden library resources. Do you know how to use the Online Catalog to manage your account, borrow ebooks, find the library’s newest books on our website weekly, and use subscription resources available through the library, including Ancestry.com? Come learn more about the many hidden resources the library offers.Keep up with the latest library news and events at adamscolibrary.org, or follow the Adams County Public Library on Facebook. last_img read more

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Northeast Johnson County morning roundup

first_img72nd Terrace block party helps a good cause. Thirteen year old Henry Ismert and some of his St. Ann’s Catholic School classmates organized a neighborhood get together over the weekend that benefited area families in need. Ismert helped put together a block party for his neighbors on 72nd Terrace in Prairie Village, but asked that attendees make donations to a local food pantry.NEJC approaching three inches of rain. Rainfall totals overnight were approaching nearly three inches at sensors in northeast Johnson County by 7 a.m. this morning, and the rain was still coming down steadily. Lamar at Turkey Creek recorded 2.8 inches overnight while Martway at Rock Creek had 2.64 inches in the six hours since 1 a.m. The three-inch rainfalls have started to become a common occurrence this summer.Wentz featured in TV segment after taking part in Junior Home Run Derby. WDAF last week ran a segment on SM East baseball star Joey Wentz after he arrived back in Kansas City from participating in the Junior Home Run Derby in Cincinnati. Wentz’s longest drive of the event was a staggering 543 feet. [SM East High School student comes home power hitting hero after Junior Home Run Derby — WDAF]Second man charged in shooting that killed former SM North student. Overland Park Police have made a second arrest in the June 30 shooting that killed former SM North student Velik Henderson and 19-year-old Trevon Anderson. Police arrested Marquise Stokes of Kansas City, Kan., on first degree murder charges. Stokes is being held on a $2 million bond. [Second man is charged with murder in Overland Park shooting — Associated Press]Mission police schedule another coffee. Mission police officers will be at Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive Friday for another round of conversation and coffee in their “Coffee with a Cop” program. The session starts at 8 a.m. and gives residents a chance to talk casually with officers and ask questions.Lawyer volunteers to defend Robinson in court. An Olathe attorney has volunteered to defend Sarah Robinson in municipal court. Robinson is cited for shoplifting and was the object of an outpouring of community support earlier this month. Attorney David Langston said he will represent her on the shoplifting charge at no cost. [Lawyer will help homeless mother caught shoplifting free of charge – KCTV 5 News]The Northeast Johnson County morning roundup is brought to you by Twisted Sisters Coffee Shop on Johnson Drive. For updates on the latest blends and specialty drinks available, follow them on Facebook.last_img read more

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News Scan for Oct 14, 2020

first_imgStudy finds no increased COVID-19 risk for childcare workersIn one of the first large-scale studies of COVID-19 transmission in US childcare programs, no association was found between day care exposure and COVID-19 transmission risk for providers.The Pediatrics study analyzed online survey data from 57,335 childcare workers—identified through a variety of national childcare organization contact lists—who reported activity from Apr 1 to May 27. Participants indicated whether they tested positive or were hospitalized for COVID-19 as well as their level of exposure to childcare settings. The analysis included county-level COVID-19 data, median household income, and participants’ personal health precautions.In both unmatched and matched case-control analyses, no association was shown between COVID-19 outcome and exposure to care (unmatched odds ratio [OR], 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 1.38, P = 0.66; matched OR, 0.94, 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.21, P = 0.64). Disease risk for childcare workers was associated with high levels of county-level cumulative per capita COVID-19 deaths (OR, 1.60, 95% CI, 1.19 to 2.15, P = 0.00).Higher COVID-19 rates were reported for providers who identified as American Indian/Alaskan Native, African American/black, or Hispanic, but avoiding high-risk situations and travel was shown to be a protective factor. These factors were not associated with exposure to childcare, “suggesting a lack of association between child care exposure and COVID-19 outcomes regardless of these other factors,” the authors conclude.The authors recognize that increased infection mitigation practices—such as smaller groups, cohorting, distancing, symptom screening, handwashing, and disinfecting—early in the pandemic may have played a role in reducing transmission, and they caution that these findings should not be generalized to other educational settings with different environments and age-groups.”Even after adjusting for other variables, community-level transmission remained a significant predictor of child care providers testing positive or being hospitalized for COVID-19, highlighting the importance of reopening child care programs only when background transmission rates are low and decreasing,” the authors wrote.Oct 1 Pediatrics study COVID-19 conspiracies increase vaccine hesitancy, study showsA Royal Society Open Science study yesterday found that small increases in receptivity to conspiracy theories equate to large increases in vaccine hesitancy, demonstrating a powerful effect of misinformation on pandemic health behaviors.Scientists from the University of Cambridge conducted large, national surveys in the United Kingdom, United States, Ireland, Mexico, and Spain in April, asking participants to rate the reliability of statements and popular myths about COVID-19 on a seven-point scale from “very unreliable” to “very reliable,” and to provide demographic data, information about political ideology, and other related information.The scientists found that a one-unit increase in perceived reliability of misinformation was associated with a 23% drop in the participant’s likelihood to get vaccinated (OR, 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72 to 0.83) and a 28% decrease in the odds that they would recommend vaccination for vulnerable friends and family (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.78).Notably, a large majority of people in all countries judged misinformation statements as unreliable, with a median score across all countries of 2.46 (standard deviation, 1.32), although certain conspiracy theories were rated as reliable by a significant percentage of participants in all nations.The claim that the coronavirus was engineered in a Wuhan laboratory was embraced as reliable by 22% to 23% of participants in Britain and United States, 26% in Ireland, 33% in Mexico, and 37% in Spain. Conspiracy statements involving global vaccination plots were also rated as reliable by significant numbers of participants across all five nations.Factors that increased the likelihood of susceptibility to misinformation included identification as more right-wing or politically conservative, younger age (except in Mexico), and trust in politicians to effectively tackle the crisis. Factors that reduced susceptibility to misinformation included scoring high on numeracy tasks and a declared high level of trust in scientists.”Numeracy skills are the most significant predictor of resistance to misinformation that we found,” said lead author Jon Roozenbeek, PhD, in a Cambridge University news release. “The fostering of numerical skills for sifting through online information could well be vital for curbing the ‘infodemic’ and promoting good public health behaviour.”Oct 14 R Soc Open Sci studyOct 13 University of Cambridge news release Plant-derived flu vaccine is non-inferior, studies showA quadrivalent (four-strain) flu vaccine derived from the Nicotiana benthamiana plant, a relative of the tobacco plant, produces “non-inferior” results at minimum, according to the results of two phase 3 vaccine efficacy (VE) trials published in a Lancet study yesterday.The first study found a 35.1% absolute VE (95% CI, 17.9% to 48.7%) for respiratory illness caused by matched strains in adults 16 to 64 years of age, and the second reported an 8.8% relative VE (95% CI, -16.7% to 28.7%) across all strains in adults 65 and older compared with a chicken egg–derived quadrivalent inactivated vaccine.The researchers conducted their randomized, observer-blind studies in Northern Hemisphere locations across Europe, Asia, and North America. In the 18-to-64 study, researchers administered either the plant-derived vaccine or a placebo to 10,160 people during the 2017-18 flu season. Serious adverse events were comparable between the two groups, with 55 (1.1%) of the 5,064 who received the plant-derived vaccine experiencing a severe effect and 51 (1.0%) of the 5,072 in the placebo group experiencing one. While the 18-to-64 study produced suboptimal results—the target was 70%—the flu VE for that year in the United Kingdom was 15%.As for the older-adult study, 12,794 adults 65 years of age or older either received the plant-derived vaccine or an egg-based vaccine during the 2018-19 flu season. Of this group, 263 (4.1%) and 266 (4.2%) experienced serious adverse events, respectively. In a Lancet commentary, John Tregoning, PhD, of Imperial College London, adds, “Notably, although the plant-derived vaccine was equally protective, it induced a lower antibody response, measured by haemagglutination inhibition and microneutralisation.” Oct 13 Lancet study Oct 13 Lancet commentary WHO: Some parts of world report slight flu upticksIt its latest update on the global flu situation, the World Health Organization (WHO) said some countries are reporting rising flu activity, but it added the caveat that current data should be interpreted with caution, owing to impacts on circulation and surveillance due to the COVID-19 pandemic.Overall, flu is still at lower levels than expected for this time of the year in both hemispheres, but slight increases have been reported in Cambodia, Laos, a few Pacific islands, Afghanistan, and southern China.Testing of respiratory samples at national labs that are part of the WHO surveillance network during the last half of September are still finding few samples that are positive for flu: only 99 positive tests of 50,521 specimens. Of the positive samples, 60.6% were influenza A, and of the subtyped influenza A viruses, all were H3N2.Oct 12 WHO global flu update LymeX, a $25 million public-private initiative, focuses on diagnosesOn Oct 10, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation announced the launch of LymeX, an initiative to improve diagnostics and patient care for tick-borne diseases such as Lyme disease. The $25 million partnership is the largest Lyme disease public-private partnership in history.Inspired by Alexandra Cohen’s personal experience with Lyme disease and the format of KidneyX—which includes innovation competitions—LymeX hopes to tackle tick-borne diseases by facilitating and supporting stakeholder engagement, education and awareness, and next-generation diagnostics.The initiative does not replace or take away from other government programs focused on ticks or tick-borne disease, but it is the latest act that the federal government has taken in this area.The Lyme Innovation Initiative, which LymeX is now a part of, was launched by HHS in 2018. Since then, other notable actions have included the Kay Hagan Tick Act and its $150 million in funding over 5 years, as well as President Donald Trump’s request for an additional $58 million in funding for issues related to tick-borne diseases in the 2021 budget. Oct 12 HHS press releaselast_img read more

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NCAA tournament schedule: Thursday’s March Madness times, TV guide

first_img MUST-READ STORIES• Three things to know about March Madness on Thursday. It’s the first weekend of the NCAA tournament, so get to know some of the underdogs.• Ranking all 16 of Thursday’s games by watchability. One of the most exciting times in sports begins Thursday.• ‘Worst 90 minutes’ for college basketball coaches. Anxiety builds as the minutes tick away entirely too slowly.• The NCAA tournament bracket cheat sheet you know you need. USA TODAY Sports and For The Win provide a one-stop shop for the NCAA tournament with all the analysis and insight you’ll need to win your office pool.• The most overseeded, underseeded teams. Shelby Mast, who provides bracketology analysis for USA TODAY Sports, identifies some of the odd decisions the NCAA men’s basketball selection committee made Sunday.• NCAA tournament committee gets the top seeds right. For all the grumbling about snubs and surprising NCAA tournament selections this year, give the committee credit where credit is due: It nailed the top seed lines.• Five reasons Kentucky won’t win it all. Now that it looks as if our prediction is careening into the wall, it’s time to start steering into the skid.• Five double-digit Cinderalla candidates. The brackets are out. The pundits are frothing. The numbers are being crunched. Here are five double-digit Cinderellas to keep an eye on in the second round.PHOTOS: All 68 teams in the 2015 NCAA tournament***• 12:15 p.m. (3) Notre Dame vs. (14) Northeastern / Midwest regionCBS. Brian Anderson, Steve Smith, Lewis Johnson.• 12:40 p.m. (3) Iowa State vs. (14) UAB / South regiontruTV. Verne Lundquist, Jim Spanarkel, Allie LaForce• 1:40 p.m. (3) Baylor vs. (14) Georgia St. / West regionTBS. Andrew Catalon, Steve Lappas, Jamie Erdahl• 2:10 p.m. (2) Arizona vs. (15) Texas Southern / West regionTNT. Kevin Harlan, Reggie Miller, Dan Bonner, Rachel Nichols• 2:45 p.m. (6) Butler vs. (11) Texas / Midwest regionCBS. Brian Anderson, Steve Smith, Lewis Johnson• 3:10 p.m. (6) SMU vs. (11) UCLA / South regiontruTV. Verne Lundquist, Jim Spanarkel, Allie LaForce• 4:10 p.m. (6) Xavier vs. (11) Ole Miss / West regionTBS. Andrew Catalon, Steve Lappas, Jamie Erdahl• 4:40 p.m. (7) VCU vs. (10) Ohio State / West regionTNT. Kevin Harlan, Reggie Miller, Dan Bonner, Rachel Nichols• 6:50 p.m. (1) Villanova vs. (16) Lafayette / East regionTBS. Brian Anderson, Steve Smith, Lewis Johnson• 7:10 p.m. (8) Cincinnati vs. (9) Purdue / Midwest regionCBS. Verne Lundquist, Jim Spanarkel, Allie LaForce• 7:20 p.m. (4) North Carolina vs. (13) Harvard / West regionTNT. Andrew Catalon, Steve Lappas, Jamie Erdahl• 7:27 p.m. (5) Utah vs. (12) Stephen F. Austin / South regiontruTV. Kevin Harlan, Reggie Miller, Dan Bonner, Rachel Nichols• 9:20 p.m. (8) NC State vs. (9) LSU / East regionTBS. Brian Anderson, Steve Smith, Lewis Johnson• 9:40 p.m. (1) Kentucky vs. (16) Hampton / Midwest regionCBS. Verne Lundquist, Jim Spanarkel, Allie LaForce• 9:50 p.m. (5) Arkansas vs. (12) Wofford / West regionTNT. Andrew Catalon, Steve Lappas, Jamie Erdahl• 9:57 p.m. (4) Georgetown vs. (13) Eastern Washington / South regiontruTV. Kevin Harlan, Reggie Miller, Dan Bonner, Rachel Nichols The Round of 64 at the NCAA tournament tips off Thursday, with a full slate of 16 games, beginning just after noon ET.Here is everything you need to know for the coverage as March Madness heats up.Take a look at the full bracket and print it here.last_img read more

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Convincing wins for arch rivals

first_imgDemerara defeated the President’s XI by 168 runs while Berbice registered a 257-run victory over Essequibo in the second round of the Guyana Cricket Board/Dave’s West Indian Imports Inter-county Under-15 tournament at the Everest Cricket Club and Lusignan Community Centre grounds respectively. Despite scattered showers, Demerara won the toss and elected to bat first, piling up 270-7 from their 50 overs and then limited the President’s XI to 102 all out in 40.3 overs.Demerara was led by Jadon Campbell with a top score of 81. He struck 11 boundaries before he was run out attempting to a couple.Rampertab Ramnauth lifts his bat after scoring 147 not out against Essequibo at Lusignan Community Centre.Campbell was the centre of the batting attack, sharing in multiple partnerships, including a fourth-wicket stand of 65 with Zachary Jodah who closed unbeaten on 53, with four boundaries after he was dropped on 10. Earlier, Campbell and Mavindra Dindyal collaborated for a 65-run partnership with Dindyal scoring 41, a knock which included four fours and two sixes. Dindyal was trapped leg before wicket to 12-year-old leg-spinner, Sanjay Algoo.Campbell also joined with his captain, Alvin Mohabir, to forge a partnership of 53. Mohabir contributed 21 before leg-spinner, Nityanand Mathura pulled off a marvelous return catch.In reply, 14-year-old Satya France looked composed with 34, elegantly finding the gaps with four boundaries, two of which were punched through the covers. However, looking to slap a delivery from, Danesh Persaud through the covers, plucked out Mohabir to end his innings. Algoo returned to chip in with 13 while Anthony Khan made 10. They were the only other batsmen with double figure contributions.Jodah came back with his left-arm orthodox spin to take 3-23 while Persaud bagged 2-9.Afterwards, Mohabir said the fielding still needed fine tuning but added that he was happy with the team’s all-round performance, pointing out that Campbell batted well while Jodah contributed with both bat and ball. Mathura, in an invited comment, said the bowling did not click today but credited good batting for Demerara’s victory. He said that he is hopeful his side can bounce back well when the face the defending champions, Berbice tomorrow.Meanwhile, on the East Coast, Berbice bounced back from their dismal performance inMatthew Pottaya picked up 3-12 with his off-spin.the first round to notch up 290-3 from their allotted overs before bowling out Essequibo for a paltry 33 in 22.3 overs. Vice-captain, Rampertab Ramnauth secured the first century of the tournament with an unbeaten 147. His unblemished innings included 10 boundaries but the highlight of his innings was his ability to play the ball on the ground and pick the gaps well, securing secure lots of two’s.The left-handed batsman shared in a 98-run opening stand with Avishkar Persaud (28) while  a 147-run stand with Tameshwar Mahadeo flattened Essequibo.Mahadeo stroked three boundaries during his 54.In the bowling department, the 12-year-old off-spinner, Matthew Pottaya continued his superb form to take 3-12 while left arm orthodox Bhaskar Dhanai and off-spinner Salim Khan picked up two wickets each. Sarwan Disram was the only batsman to reach double figures, scoring 11.After the match, Rampertab said it was a good feeling to score the first century of the tournament and that he looked forward to continuing to do well for his side.last_img read more

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For ornery shelter cats, 2nd chance is a job chasing mice

first_img In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo, Spike who is up for adoption as a working cat looks out from its cage at the Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) facility in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) CORRECTS CAT’S NAME TO GARY FROM GREGORY – In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo Gary, a cat adopted through Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) working cat adoption program, sits in a box at his new home at the Bella Vista Beer Distributors in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) PHILADELPHIA | Gary wasn’t used to being around people. He didn’t like being touched, or even looked at. If anyone came too close, he’d lash out.He was perfect for the job. Because at the “Working Cats” program, no manners is no problem.Philadelphia’s Animal Care and Control Team established the program about four years ago to place unadoptable cats — the biters and the skittish, the swatters and the ones who won’t use a litter box — into jobs as mousers at barns or stables. In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo, Ame Dorminy, spokeswoman for the Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) CORRECTS CAT’S NAME TO GARY FROM GREGORY – In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo Gary, a cat adopted through Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) working cat adoption program, sits on a shelf on the retail floor at his new home at the Bella Vista Beer Distributors in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) The shelter recently expanded the program to move cats that were less-than-ideal pets into urban jobs at places like factories and warehouses as a sort of green pest control. The animals are microchipped, vaccinated and free of charge.“Part of the reason cats became domesticated was to get rid of the rodent population,” said Ame Dorminy, ACCT’s spokeswoman. “We took advantage of their natural propensity to hunt and made an official program out of it.”Cats identified as a good match for the program are kept in a separate aisle at the shelter in a row called “TTA” — time to adjust. On a recent visit, a low growl could be heard from a cage housing a male named Spike, whose intake sheet listed his qualifications: hissing, swatting, spitting, can’t be picked up. A few doors down, Prince was standoffish at the rear of his cage.Just because cats don’t want to be petted or snuggle on a lap doesn’t mean they can’t have good lives, Dorminy said.“A lot of these cats feel more comfortable when they can be themselves and use natural behaviors,” she said. “Then they’re more open to human interaction because they feel more confident.”At Bella Vista Beer Distributors, mice were gnawing on bags of chips overnight, leaving a mess and forcing staffers to throw out about 15 bags a day, said owner Jordan Fetfatzes.They tried exterminators, but nothing worked. An employee found ACCT’s program online and Fetfatzes eventually decided on Gary, a white male with one blue eye and one green that had “behavioral issues.” Gary wasn’t accustomed to people and would hiss from the crate. At first, Gary would stay in the office and would only go into the warehouse after hours.As the weeks passed, he warmed up to workers and customers, and has transformed into a sweet, playful mascot with free rein of the store.“My only complaint is sometimes he gets in the way of a transaction,” said Fetfatzes, who describes himself as a “dog guy” who’s turned in to a cat lover thanks to Gary.Neighborhood kids come in just to say hi to him, and he loves to play soccer with a worker who balls up cash register tape and kicks it around as Gary bats at it.As for the mice, they vanished, seemingly repelled by Gary’s scent, Fetfatzes said.“You’re not only saving your business money, you are helping save the life of an unwanted pet,” he said. “And in this case, we made a friend.”A number of shelters around the country have working cat programs. One of the first, in Los Angeles, launched in 1999. Many focus on placing feral cats into barns and stables. Chicago’s Tree House Humane Society places feral cats at condos and suburban backyards. Pennsylvania’s Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals puts its feral cats to work in all kinds of jobs, from barns to breweries.Todd Curry wasn’t exactly sure what was inside the dumpster next door to the Emerald Windows showroom, but it seemed like a free buffet for rats.“It was almost comical,” he said, comparing it to a scene in the animated film “Ratatouille” with seemingly hundreds of rats streaming out of the dumpster.Traps didn’t work, said Curry, the company’s vice president of sales, so they brought in Shelley from ACCT’s program.Soon, dismembered rat carcasses started appearing. Now the rodents just stay away.And Shelley, which was given to the shelter after biting her family’s kids, has come out of her shell, craving petting and attention, Curry said.“The only reason she was here was for the rats, but it has turned into a lot more than that,” he said, adding she functions as a workplace stress reliever.“It’s nice to see these cats put to use, not put down.” CORRECTS CAT’S NAME TO GARY FROM GREGORY – In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo, Gary, a cat adopted through Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) working cat adoption program, walks on the retail floor at his new home at the Bella Vista Beer Distributors in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo, Todd Curry, vice president of sales at Emerald Windows pets Shelley, a cat adopted through Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) working cat adoption program, in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) CORRECTS CAT’S NAME TO GARY FROM GREGORY – In this Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 photo Jordan Fetfatzes the owner of the Bella Vista Beer Distributors pets Gary, a cat adopted through Animal Care and Control Team of Philadelphia (ACCT) working cat adoption program, in Philadelphia. The program places cats who have behavioral challenges with non-traditional homes such as factories and stores and their presence have helped control the rodent population on a property. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)last_img read more

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