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SF Beer Week 2017 a Celebration of Innovation

first_imgAdvertisementTickets Now On Sale!SFBW Opening Gala Friday, February 10, 2017 – Pier 48, San Francisco, CASan Francisco, CA — Thursday, January 5, 2017 — The San Francisco Brewers Guild and Northern California’s finest breweries are hard at work planning for an incredible week of craft beer celebrations throughout the Bay Area during SF Beer Week 2017. With the return of the country’s premier Beer Week, the ever-increasing innovation and creativity taking shape in breweries across the region will be on full display like no other SF Beer Week before it. The SF Beer Week Opening Gala, the top-tier regional invitational festival that kicks off the festivities at Pier 48 on February 10, will spotlight flavor-driven brewing innovations glass by glass. Revelations and discoveries will continue through hundreds of thirst-quenching events around the greater San Francisco Bay Area, wrapping up on February 19. Tickets to the Opening Gala are now on sale at sfbeerweek.org (VIP: $120/GA: $80).Over 100 breweries operate in one of the world’s most creative regions. The Bay Area continues to be a hotbed of beer innovation, where trends and techniques are created, rediscovered and riffed on. Flipping beer styles on their heads, wielding a growing influence on celebrity chefs’ dishes and renowned restaurant’s beverage menus, adapting beer-making techniques, creating specialized businesses like fermentation-only facilities, embracing entrepreneurial endeavors as with California’s first artisan malting company — innovation continues apace in the City by the Bay and the broader area.San Francisco is America’s first craft brewing region. Craft beer — along with its runaway international hit, American IPA — was born of the Bay Area’s spirit of innovation. In 1975, SF’s Anchor Brewing Co.‘s breakaway Anchor Liberty Ale — the crisp, dry-hopped ale that foreshadowed the modern American IPA — created a flavor benchmark for the growing ranks of homebrewers and brewers. Up in Santa Rosa, Russian River’s Vinnie Cilurzo created the world’s first Double IPA, the acclaimed Pliny the Elder, followed by the now-legendary prototypical Triple IPA, Pliny the Younger, set for a Friday, February 3, release, and on tap through most of SF Beer Week.Northern California brewers are proud of their regional heritage and the trends they have given rise to but are not insular. They not only forge new paths, but adopt new approaches and, like jazz impresarios, constantly riff and refine. The explosion of beer substyles on tap during SF Beer Week will attest to that exchange.The Bay Area has also shaken the world’s culinary assumptions ever since Chef Alice Waters famously led the charge for local, seasonal cuisine at Chez Panisse in Berkeley starting in 1971. Many top restaurants in the region, from The French Laundry to State Bird Provisions, devote welcome attention to their beer lists and pairings. Gastropubs and beer-centric eateries — such as Smokestack at Magnolia and Hog’s Apothecary — bring kitchen cred to casual and bar top dining as well. During SF Beer Week, dozens of beer dinners take it to another level.The rise of hyper-local breweries entirely focused on serving community first through their taprooms has created a new neighborhood hangout across the Bay Area. Dozens of breweries are selling fresh-brewed beer on site and hand-delivering kegs to just a few trusted bars. These breweries are embracing near-continuous rotation and experimentation in their taprooms, moving away from year-round flagship brews. Innovative design and graphics flourish throughout the region with brewery t-shirts replacing rock ‘n’ roll shirts, and beer labels destined for the walls of fine art institutions, such as the newly renovated SFMOMA.As is true across the country, collaboration beers are all the rage throughout the Bay Area. The San Francisco brewing community innovates together, cooking up collaboration beers with colleagues from near and far, for the camaraderie, the creative challenge and just to mix things up. For SF Beer Week 2017, San Francisco Brewers Guild has officially announced its collaboration beer is New Frontier (5.3% ABV) — a postmodern Kölsch style ale with satsuma and evergreen. Medium in body and bright in flavor, New Frontier is a new-world interpretation on a classic Kölsch style. Japanese satsuma provides notes of zesty citrus, while Pacific Northwest Douglas Fir lends a light pine aroma to the finish. Specialty ingredients for New Frontier are donated by Whole Foods Market, while Brewers Supply Group provided the malt and hops, and White Labs provided the yeast. For additional information on New Frontier, please visit sfbeerweek.org/collabThis February, let the region’s leading craft beer sherpa, SF Beer Week, guide you through ten days of craft beer discovery. More than a week’s worth of compelling experiences will be waiting for you, thanks to a craft beer community devoted to innovation, experimentation and never sitting still.For detailed information regarding SF Beer Week 2017, please download the following comprehensive Media Kit 2017.The Current List of San Francisco Brewers Guild Members:21st Amendment Brewery, Almanac Beer Company, Anchor Brewing Company, Barebottle Brewing Company, Barrel Head Brewhouse, Bartlett Hall, Beach Chalet Brewery & Restaurant, Black Hammer Brewing Company, Black Sands Brewery, Cellarmaker Brewing Company, Ferment. Drink. Repeat, Fort Point Beer Company, Harmonic Brewing, Headlands Brewing Company, Holy Craft Brewery, Laughing Monk Brewing Company, Local Brewing Company, Magnolia Brewing Company, Old Bus Tavern, Pine Street Brewery, Pizza Orgasmica & Brewery, San Francisco Brewing Company, Seven Stills Brewery & Distillery, Social Kitchen & Brewery, Southern Pacific Brewing Company, Southpaw BBQ, Sufferfest Beer Company, Sunset Reservoir Brewing Company, ThirstyBear Organic Brewery, Triple Voodoo Brewery & Taproom, and Woods Beer / Cerveceria de MateVeza.The San Francisco Brewers Guild thanks all of their sponsors for SF Beer Week 2017, and especially the sponsors for the Exclusive Press Preview Happy Hour:About San Francisco Brewers GuildThe San Francisco Brewers Guild formed in 2004 as a non-profit 501(c)(6) during a renaissance in American craft brewing. Our mission is to restore and preserve San Francisco’s brewing heritage and unite those who make local beer with those who love it. The Guild achieves this by educating the public about craft beer, organizing and hosting events such as SF Beer Week, Brews on the Bay and Meet the Brewers, advocating for the craft beer industry in city government, donating services and product to local charities, and partnering with artisan producers in the food, beverage, hospitality and agricultural industries.For more information, please visit:[email protected]/SFBeerWeeksfbrewersguild.orgAdvertisement Facebook Home Industry News Releases Beer Business SF Beer Week 2017 a Celebration of InnovationIndustry News ReleasesBeer BusinessSF Beer Week 2017 a Celebration of InnovationBy Press Release – January 5, 2017 56 0 TAGSConsumerSan Francisco Brewers GuildSF Beer Week Previous articleExplore Southern California on a California Wines Road TripNext articleAfternoon Brief, January 5 Press Release Share ReddIt Pinterest Email Twitter Linkedinlast_img read more

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‘Yellowstone’ boasts Costner, strong Native American co-star

first_imgHomeNews‘Yellowstone’ boasts Costner, strong Native American co-star Jun. 21, 2018 at 5:00 amNews‘Yellowstone’ boasts Costner, strong Native American co-staradmin3 years agoapassociated pressmovie review “Yellowstone” has everything a worthwhile Western should, including breathtaking vistas, battles over land and Kevin Costner in the lead role.There’s also something rare in the contemporary Paramount Network series debuting Wednesday: prominent Native American story lines and parts, including one filled by an actor formidable enough to stand up to Costner and his ranching baron.Gil Birmingham plays Thomas Rainwater, a tribal chief and casino owner who’s ready and able to oppose those whose interests conflict with the well-being of the people he represents.Birmingham, of Comanche ancestry on his father’s side, has played his share of Native Americans and others on TV and in films including “Hell or High Water” and “Wind River,” both written by Taylor Sheridan, the creator of “Yellowstone.”“Through my career, a rather long career of struggling, mostly, I’ve been asked, ‘What would be your dream character?’ and this is it,” Birmingham said of his role on Paramount Network’s first drama series since its rebranding from Spike TV last January.Playing a fully realized, modern Indian character is an opportunity that doesn’t come often enough and one that counts beyond entertainment, the actor said.“Many people don’t even think that we (Native Americans) still exist, that we’re just historical artifacts that once upon a time existed,” he said, crediting Sheridan with a “great leap forward” in the 10-part series and on the big screen.Birmingham tips his hat as well to Costner and his 1990 Oscar-winning period drama “Dances with Wolves,” which “really did open the door for people for maybe the first time … to see the beauty and the depths of the native culture.”Costner, also an executive producer on “Yellowstone,” said authenticity is his goal with any project. That’s particularly important in the show’s portrayal of Native Americans, he said, for whom “a terrible wrong” has occurred and not been remedied.Sheridan got the balance “letter perfect,” with the nuance and imperfection that characters of every ethnicity warrant, he said.The series, set in Montana, was filmed there and in Utah.Costner stars as John Dutton, a die-hard Westerner determined to keep his family’s holdings intact. There are pressures from without — including land developers, oil and lumber interests and the adjacent Indian reservation and Yellowstone National Park — and from within, courtesy of his family.Dutton’s offspring include Kayce (Luke Grimes), estranged and living on the reservation with his Native American wife, Monica (Kelsey Asbille); lawyer Jamie (Wes Bentley), eager to please his dad, and heir apparent Lee (Dave Annable), who’s running the family operation with Dutton.The sole daughter, Beth (Kelly Reilly), more than keeps up her end, filling in for her late mother as family matriarch and doubling as a cutthroat business negotiator.The role of Thomas Rainwater was Birmingham’s for the taking after he proved himself to Sheridan in “Wind River” and “Hell or High Water,” which earned the filmmaker an Oscar bid for best screenplay.Birmingham couples technical proficiency with artistic expression in his work, Sheridan said, and Rainwater’s character required particular deftness.“It’s the ability to be cunning without it being misconstrued as evil,” said Sheridan, who recalled advising Birmingham that Rainwater needed to be seen as “an equal force to people who have a real disregard for the rule of law, and yet never lose his goodness.”The actor has a personal connection with his character’s story. Rainwater grew up unaware of his ancestry because his adoptive parents withheld his background from him, while Birmingham’s late father downplayed his native heritage.Birmingham left home at 14, ultimately attending the University of Southern California and working as a petrochemical engineer. A foray into bodybuilding served as an improbable wake-up call to embrace the arts.“I was more intrigued by the aesthetic ability to form a body like a sculpture. In my creative desire, I just knew I couldn’t do the engineering anymore. It didn’t speak to me, to my spirit,” he said.Another unlikely step — he got a part in Diana Ross’ music video “Muscles” — propelled him into acting, although the guitar had captured his imagination as a youngster and he’d hoped for a musical career.That dream has yet to be fulfilled, but Birmingham said it allowed him to make an instant connection with fellow actor-musician Jeff Bridges when they had just a few days to rehearse their roles as longtime friends in “Hell or High Water.”Birmingham marvels at what’s happened since he decided as a teenager he would rather be on the street in San Francisco (before becoming a ward of the court and entering a boys’ home) and find his own path.“The events of my life unfolded in such a way that they placed me in places I never would have imagined. And the only way that I could move forward was to trust,” Birmingham said.Tags :apassociated pressmovie reviewshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentTourism Talks: – Five Important Tips for Safety While TravelingSummer Soulstice returns to heat up Main Street with music and moreYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall10 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson20 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter20 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor20 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press20 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press20 hours agolast_img read more

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Authorities: Man upset about vaping cracked brother’s skull

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Twitter Facebook Authorities: Man upset about vaping cracked brother’s skull WhatsApp (Photo supplied/LaPorte County Sheriff’s Office) LAPORTE, Ind. (AP) — Authorities say a man struck his 15-year-old brother in the head in northwestern Indiana because he was upset about the teen vaping indoors, causing a skull fracture that led to his death.The (Northwest Indiana) Times reports that a recording of a hearing in the involuntary manslaughter case against 21-year-old Tyler Kiger detailed the circumstances of the June 7 dispute involving Michael Kiger. It happened in rural LaPorte County at their great-grandmother’s home.Records don’t yet list a defense lawyer, but their father has said Tyler Kiger didn’t intend to harm his brother.LaPorte County sheriff’s Detective Sgt. Adam Hannon says Michael Kiger called 911 and told the dispatcher he had head pain after his brother hit him. He was pronounced dead June 8 at a home in LaPorte. Google+ Pinterest Previous articleBomb threat prompts evacuation of Cass County CourthouseNext articleSouthwest Michigan man convicted in 2 killings gets 2nd life sentence Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Facebook By Jon Zimney – June 22, 2019 0 334 Google+last_img read more

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Judge considers intoxication experts in Vanderbilt rape case

first_imgA judge is expected to rule by the end of the week whether to allow a forensic psychologist to testify about intoxication in the defense of Cory Batey, one of four former Vanderbilt University football players accused of rape.Criminal Court Judge Monte Watkins denied other requests for a change of trial venue and sequestered jury during a hearing Monday.State fights to block access to Vanderbilt rape recordsAfter the hearing, attorney Worrick Robinson told a gaggle of reporters that evidence of intoxication will be critical, and probably in more than just Batey’s case.“I think it goes to the extent of, also, that because of alcohol there was more than just Mr. Batey that had made decisions that night that they probably would not normally make,” Robinson said.The Tennessean asked Robinson to whom he was referring.“I think that will come out in the evidence,” Robinson said. “I don’t think it’s a big secret that all the parties in that room were under the influence of alcohol to some extent. This case is a lot about alcohol consumption. That’s why I think having the expert testify about the effects of alcohol is critical, absolutely critical.”Police say former football player Brandon Vandenburg and a 21-year-old woman were drinking heavily the night of the alleged rape. In the dorm room, police say, Vandenburg, Batey and two others raped and sexually abused the woman while she was unconscious.Assistant District Attorney Roger Moore argued that intoxication is not a legally valid defense in many of the charges against Batey. He said the doctor’s testimony may be relevant later in the case, but not in front of a jury that can use common sense to determine the effects of intoxication.Watkins on Monday said he would decide whether to allow the evidence by the end of the week. He also denied requests to change the trial venue, pull a jury from another county and sequester the jurors.Study may change fight against campus sexual assaultsAlbert Perez Jr., an attorney for Vandenburg, brought a copy of The Tennessean’s Sunday edition — featuring a story about college sexual assault — to court to show intense media coverage he said tainted the jury pool.Watkins said he believed a fair jury could be found, and there was not enough time or money to coordinate those requests.The case has been pending for 18 months, and Vandenburg and Batey are set for trial Jan. 12. The joint trial was set to begin Nov. 3 but was delayed after Robinson suffered a shoulder injury while trimming yard foliage.In court Monday, his left arm was cradled in a sling under his suit jacket.Reach Stacey Barchenger at 615-726-8968 or on Twitter @sbarchenger.last_img read more

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NFL’s first full-time female official low-key as debut nears

first_imgIn this Aug. 16, 2013, file photo, NFL referee Sarah Thomas works the game in the second half of an NFL preseason football game between the New Orleans Saints and the Oakland Raiders at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans.  (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton, File)IRVING, Texas (AP) _ Sarah Thomas shared hugs and idle chatter at her first preseason clinic since the NFL made her the first full-time female on-field official.All of her colleagues were doing the same thing Friday in what amounts to the unofficial end of their offseason. The pharmaceutical representative and mother of three was just another one of the guys, which is how she hopes coaches and players see her when the regular season starts in two months.“I know it may be new for some, but I think being a part of the developmental program and going that way, maybe they’ll see me just as an official,” Thomas said. “That’s how I want them to see me.”The 41-year-old Thomas won’t be the first woman to call a regular-season game. That was Shannon Eastin in 2012 when the NFL used replacement officials during a labor dispute. But she will be the first one getting a full season _ and a lot of attention along the way.“I certainly wouldn’t want that attention,” said a chuckling Aaron Santi, one of nine other first-year officials likely to get that wish. “It’s going to be tougher for her. She’s going to be under the microscope a little more because the reality is this is a really difficult job and we all make mistakes. Hopefully the fans and the public and the media will allow her to make mistakes and not treat her with a different standard than anyone else.”Thomas, who will be a line judge in 2015, is already the first female official in major college football, and the first to work a bowl game. She’s been in the NFL’s development program for two years, so she has done training camps and preseason games.As for the novelty of being an NFL regular, long-time referee Ed Hochuli says that will wear off fast.“It’ll be a big deal for the first few games,” Hochuli said. “Then it will go away. And then it’s a matter of are you right or wrong in your calls and you’re just another official out there and you get treated the same.”Thomas, who grew up and still lives in Mississippi, recalled the story of her first game as an official, when she was asked to be the clock operator and told one of her mentors that she didn’t even know where the clock was. Thomas was a basketball player in high school and college and never worried about finding the clock.“So he said, `Well, we can train monkeys to do the clock, and we’re just short of them tonight, so it’s your job,”’ Thomas said. “That’s how I got introduced.”Thomas said not much has changed since the NFL hired her three months ago _ “working out and rules study, film review, talking to mentors that I have. Same thing.”And she won’t be expecting players to treat her any differently.“They just want the job to be done and be done consistently,” Thomas said. “Done right.”Referee Walt Coleman, getting ready for his 27th season, has another view of Thomas as one of the guys: her career path.“They work their way up,” he said. “They work junior high. They work high school. They work college football. And so when they get the opportunity to work in the NFL, they’re working with the best officials in the world.”And that means she can expect the fans to hate her the same way they do every guy around her.“I can tell you, when you get out there, with all those guys in those striped shirts, and everybody’s going to be after us,” said Coleman, whose son Walt Coleman IV is among the first-year officials. “And it’s going to be the same way for Walter and Sarah or whoever it is. Once that game starts, it’s going to be back to the same old football.”And Thomas is ready.For the grief. For the second-guessing. For the attention.“The spotlight is what it is and being a first, I know that’s the reason this is,” she said. “I get it. It just comes with the territory. So no big deal.”She’s used to it.last_img

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Football: Peter Schmeichel and Denis Irwin unveil the new line of Manchester United watches

first_imgAdvertisement 7h7elNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vsb1w8lWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ebri7y( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) abfaWould you ever consider trying this?😱7kaCan your students do this? 🌚w4Roller skating! Powered by Firework Peter Schmeichel(L) and Denis Irwin(R) unveiling the watches.Manchester United launched their new line of TAG Heur Special Edition watches today in Miami, USA.Advertisement Former Manchester United skipper and one of the G.O.A.T goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel put out a tweet with some pictures which shows him and former full-back, Denis Irwin, launching the watches.Here’s the tweet: Advertisement He wrote: “Great time out in Miami with Dennis Irwin launching the @ManUtd watch with @TAGHeuer #DontCrackUnderPressure “.    Advertisementlast_img read more

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NBA: Kobe Bryant’s $6M investment in BodyArmor is now worth $200M

first_imgAdvertisement lcoNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vswm4aWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre E5ojy9( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) dnkWould you ever consider trying this?😱a6fCan your students do this? 🌚q5Roller skating! Powered by Firework Kobe Bryant is a minority owner of the sports drink company BodyArmor. According to Darren Rovell of ESPN, Kobe bought about a 10 percent stake in the company in March 2014. He reportedly has invested about $6 million in the company overall.Advertisement When Bryant invested in BodyArmor in 2014, it was coming off a year in which it made $10 million in sales, according to Darren Rovell – now it’s expected to top $400 million in 2018. Bryant is the fourth-largest investor.Advertisement Bryant is now the fourth-largest investor in the brand, marketed as a healthier competitor to Gatorade, behind the brand’s co-founder Mike Repole, Coca-Cola and Keurig Dr Pepper.BodyArmor was Bryant’s very first investment with his new company Kobe Inc, which the basketball legend launched to help grow brands that will ‘redefine the sports industry’.Advertisement Basketball-Reference estimates Bryant’s career earnings as an NBA player at just under $330 million. He obviously made a ton more in endorsement deals as well, but his fruitful investment in BodyArmor has lifted his wealth to another level. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Cross Country: Weekend Recap

first_imgMcNeese State at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalNew Orleans at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalNorthwestern State at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalNicholls at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalStephen F. Austin at Crimson Classic Texas A&M-Corpus Christi at Crimson ClassicSam Houston State at Crimson ClassicSoutheastern Louisiana at Crimson ClassicLamar at Adidas InvitationalLamar at Pre-National InvitationalCentral Arkansas at Pre-National Invitational The Lumberjacks edged SLC foe Texas A&M-Corpus Christi (190 pts.), which finished seventh as a team, and also outran Sam Houston State (358 pts.) and Southeastern Louisiana (623 pts.) to lead the conference action. – Return to top – Host Alabama won the women’s race. Chelsea Blaase of Tennessee was the individual women’s champion with a time of 16:37.66. Shelby Polasek (19:34.43) took 129th, followed by Liz Romo (19:41.41) at 142nd. Jasmine McCoy rounded out the field for the women, finishing 188th with a time of 20:27.48. Other Demons running were Lucas Moncla (23:10.23, 26th) and Tyler Corwin (25:11.33, 31st). After Moreaux, William Hamilton finished 13th with a time of 20:49.6; Enrique Soto was 14th with a time of 21:03.6; and Bradley Traviss in 22nd place with a time of 21:53.6. – Return to top – Other top Lion finishers were: Joseph Edwards (171, 28:57.25) and Stephen Cassingham (176, 29:12.14) Titon started the day by following up her strong last outing at the LSU Invitational. After finishing ninth in Baton Rouge, Titon navigated the 5K course in a time of 19:20.40, which was good enough for eighth place. That time was also 15 seconds faster than her time at the same distance in Baton Rouge back on Sept. 20. True freshman Brittany Innis tackled the 5k course at Harry Pritchett Running Park in 17:55 to lead the way on the women’s side. Her mark was good enough for a 17th place showing out of 225 women competing at the university level. Innis, who has consistently placed in the top three for the women this year, posted a team-best time on Friday for the first time in her young collegiate career. New Orleans at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalResultsLAFAYETTE, La. – The New Orleans Privateers women’s and men’s cross country teams both turned in third-place team finishes, and Letizia Titon had another individual top ten at the Ragin’ Cajun Classic on Friday at Acadiana Park. Freshmen Clarissa Smith (20:18.40) and Haley Gregoire (20:18.40) also finished among the top 200 runners, placing 168th and 178th respectively. Stephen F. Austin at Crimson Classic Men’s ResultsWomen’s ResultsTUSCALOOSA, Ala. – The Stephen F. Austin men’s and women’s cross country teams ran to similar results on Friday evening at the University of Alabama Crimson Classic. The women placed fifth out of 25 division one programs and the men placed sixth as a team out of 24 division one schools. Callie Willcox was the second-highest Privateers finisher on the day finishing 24th out of 45 runners with a time of 20:38.70. Willcox and Titon helped guide the Privateers to a third-place finish out of six teams while also coming out ahead of Southland foe Nicholls who wound up in fifth. “This was a great way to finish this big training cycle,” said Chapoton. “And now we are going get our minds in the right place for conference.” Karl Schreiber led the Bearkat men with a 48th place finish and a time of 26:12.51. Other SHSU marks were Evan Arambula 62nd 26:28.32, Colton Stoker 81st 26:28.32, Grant Buley 83rd 26:46.30, Logan Terry 84th 26:47.46, Ryan Saam 97th 26:52.94 and Patrick Pitts 100th 27:06.55. Northwestern State at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalLAFAYETTE, La. – Freshmen Erin Wrozek and Josh Wilkins were the fastest Northwestern State finishers Friday evening at the Ragin’ Cajuns Cross Country Invitational at Acadiana Park, as NSU competed for the last time until hosting the Southland Conference Championships on Nov. 3. Veteran Shelby Pesek came in right behind Innis with a time of 18:01. The junior secured 22 points for the Ladyjacks with the 22nd place finish. Redshirt freshman Courtney High was right on Pesek’s heels until the finish, completing the course in 18:07 – just 12 seconds off Innis’ pace – to place 26th. The trio of Innis, Pesek and High have led the team in each of the three meets in which they all competed this season. UL-Lafayette’s Anna Devitt won the race in 17:32.40. The host team won the meet with a score of 20. – Return to top – “I’m really impressed with our freshman,” Chapoton said. “They’ve been steadily improving each week and they have ran really well lately. Their work is paying off.” – Return to top – Texas A&M-Corpus Christi at Crimson ClassicTUSCALOOSA, Ala. – The Texas A&M-Corpus Christi men’s cross country team put together one of the finest performances in school history Friday at the Crimson Classic hosted by the University of Alabama. The men took seventh place overall out of 33 of the best teams in the nation and the women took 19th. Wilkins ran the four-mile men’s course in 20:46.59, 12th overall. Next for NSU was Grant Butts (21:55.85, scoring 18th), followed closely by Hunter Warmack (21:59.99, scoring 19th). Completing the Demons’ scorecard were Jeremy Elliott (22:33.43, scoring 24th) and Skylor Reese (22:56.63, scoring 25th). McNeese State at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalLAFAYETTE, La. – Nicholas Kiprono and Enock Bor finished 2-3 Friday evening at the Ragin Cajun Cross Country Invitational to help pace the McNeese Cowboys to its fourth team win of the season as the squad heads to the Southland Conference Championships on Nov. 3. McNeese State University finished first as a team in the men’s competition, while the University of Louisiana-Lafayette took first for the women. Nicholls at Ragin’ Cajuns InvitationalLAFAYETTE, La. – The Nicholls State University cross country team finished fifth at the Ragin’ Cajun Invitational cross country meet on Friday. The event was held at the Harry Pritchett Course in Tuscaloosa Alabama. The women’s race covered 4,975 meters while the men’s course was 8,085 meters. On the men’s side junior Harry Wiggins turned in the top Lion time. Out of 197 Division I runners, the Prairieville native placed 79th with a time of 26:43.68. In the men’s 8k event, the Lions placed 21st out of 24 teams. The Lady Cards did a strong job of bunching several of their runners together toward the front of the pack to compete with some of the nation’s top ranked teams. Lamar was led by freshman Minttu Hukka who clocked a time of 21:17.7 to finish 30th overall. Hukka crossed the finish line 24 seconds ahead of teammate Leigh Lattimore who ended the day 58th (21:41.6). – Return to top – Wrozek finished sixth overall, covering the 5,000 meters in 19:08.50. Fellow freshman Jacqueline Rushford was the next Lady Demon across the line, 11th in 19:36.80, while Erin Sitarz ran 19th for NSU in 20:19.90. The Lady Demons entered only three runners Friday and did not record a team score. Tennessee’s Chelsea Blaase won the individual title with a time of 16:37 – running ahead of the second place runner by 38 seconds. Host Alabama won the team title with 68 points while Georgia Tech (116 pts.), Auburn (130 pts.) and Mississippi State (162 pts.) rounded out the top four ahead of the Ladyjacks. SFA beat the only other two schools from the Southland Conference by large margins as Sam Houston State (362 pts.) finished 13th and Texas A&M-Corpus Christi (494 pts.) took 19th. – Return to top – Central Arkansas at Pre-National Invitational TERRE HAUTE, Ind. – The University of Central Arkansas men’s cross country team got a 29th-place finish from Brant Cook on Saturday in the open division of the Indiana State University Pre-Nationals Invitational at the LaVern Gibson Championship XC Course. McNeese’s Danielle Jones ran a 19:56.5 to finish 13th overall and was followed by Angelina Covington in 14th place at 20:08.3. Sarah Booth finished 16th with a time of 20:12.4, Lauren Cooper in 19th at 20:29.3, and Emily Mouton in 23rd place at 21:17.4. Ana Moreno was the top finisher for the SHSU women, placing 43rd with a time of 18:21.90. Other Sam Houston performances included Olivia Olguin 47th (18:22.91), Miranda Prado 78th (18:55.02), Nicole Aponte 85th (18:58.25), Nina Gonzales 109th (19:36.67) and Haley West 115th (19:41.39). On the women’s side, following ULL and McNeese in the team standings were UNO with 122 points, Southern at 125, Louisiana Tech and Nicholls with 135 each, and Louisiana College and Northwestern State, both of which didn’t enter enough runners to qualify for a team score. Sophomores Charles Mathenge and Colby Mehmen each nudged their way into the top ten after great races to pace the SFA men. Mathenge completed the 8k track – officially marked at 8,085 meters – in 25:18 to claim eighth among 197 other division one runners. The Oklahoma State transfer has led the Lumberjacks in each of his first two competitive races of the year. A total of 224 runners participated in the women’s event while 197 took part in the men’s race. The next three Lumberjacks to cross were sophomore Anthony Gallardo (25:47), sophomore Josh Torres (26:23) and redshirt freshman Jeffrey Weisheit (26:35), placing27th, 58th and 71st respectfully. The three runners finished within a 48-second span of each other to cap the scoring for SFA. The men’s team finished in a tie for third in points with Northwestern State as both teams finished with a total of 98 points. McNeese State took top honors in the team standings with Louisiana-Lafayette coming in second. Mehmen, who has also been a familiar name among the leaders at events this year, posted a time of 25:28 to place 10th. Tulsa was first in the open division, followed by Purdue, Eastern Michigan, Ohio University, UCA, Memphis and Xavier. Junior Katie Neil set a lifetime personal record in the 5k, turning in a time of 21:50.99. The Marrero, Louisiana native placed 237th.center_img In the women’s 5k event, a total of 292 runners competed. The top Lady Lion finisher was freshman Celia Zaeringer, who turned in a time of 18:28.73. The New Orleans native placed 58th. “As a team, we have some adjustments to make but we’re moving in the right direction,” Clark said. “We’ll have two hard weeks of training now and work out a game plan to get ready to make a push for that conference championship.” On the women’s side, UCA was 32nd overall. Sophomore Brigette Caruthers finished 85th in the 6K race in a time of 23:17.0, while freshman Diana Moreno was 104th (23:29.9). Junior Sophie Clauss was 193rd (25:19.2), Helene Sensee was 206th (26:21.5) and graduate student Emily Carroll was 209th (26:34.1). The Lamar cross country teams return to action Monday, Nov. 3, when they travel to Natchitoches, La., to compete in the Southland Conference Championships. Both LU squads enter the championships as the defending Southland champions. – Return to top – Ashley Johnson led the way for the women, finishing 17th with a time of 20:12.1 in the 5k. Hannah Naquin finished a minute and eight seconds later, with a time of 21:20.4, while Callie Scull ran a 22:07.8. Alison Smegal led the Cowgirls with an overall fifth place finish with a time of 19:00.8 in the 5-kilometer race. Kaitlyn Jeter finished sixth at 19:16.4 and Corissa Storms placed eighth with a time of 19:25.3. The Cowgirls had seven of their eight runners finish in the top 20 while all runners placed in the top 25. Sebie O’Neill placed 26th to lead the men’s team with a time of 22:25.6 in the four mile. Jake Leee finished next for the Colonel men with a time of 23:49.3. The Islanders cross country teams will be back in action November 3, when they travel to Natchitoches, La., for the Southland Conference Championships. Senior Jannika John was only three seconds back of Lattimore crossing the line 63rd, while classmate Verity Ockenden ended the meet 84th with a 21:55.7. Freshman Evelyn Chavez closed out the Lady Cardinals scoring with a time of 22:10.1 on the six kilometer course. New Orleans will now prepare for the Southland Championships in Natchitoches, La. on Nov. 3. Ty McCormack of Auburn won the men’s title with a time of 24:27 and Clemson brought home the team title with 123 total points. Auburn (130 pts.), Georgia Tech (133 pts.), Rice (150 pts.) and North Florida (165 pts.) rounded out the top five just in front of SFA. The final two point-earners for SFA crossed the finish line within a two-second clip. Sophomore Bridgette Kozar (18:25) and senior Laurie Byrd (18:27) placed 50th and 55th respectfully to round out the top five and give the Ladyjacks their fourth top five showing of the year. “The women had a good meet today,” said head coach Cody Clark. “I felt that if we could finish fifth or better out of the competitive field we’d be taking the next step as a team. Brittany really stepped up for us and had a smart race today.” UL-Lafayette’s Matt Rice was the men’s individual champ in 19:48.19. – Return to top – – Return to top – Cook, a freshman from Grand Prairie, Texas, covered the 8K course in 26:36.4. Freshman Alonzo Pollum was 44th in a time of 26:57.2, followed by senior Connor Ryan in 57th (27:14.7). Senior Benjamin Stansell was 95th (28:51.0), while senior Jacob Luckett was 96th (29:17.9). On the men’s side, Clayton O’Callaghan came back fresh off his personal best in the 8K at the Watson Ford Invitational to finish 17th of 47 runners in the four-mile run. O’Callaghan turned in a time of 21:29.42 and was the top Privateers men’s finisher. Michael Batson followed closely behind with a 21:53.40, which was good for 21st place. Clemson won the men’s race. Ty McCormack of Auburn was the men’s individual champion with a clocking of 24:27.86. “The girls ran really well for never having seen a course like this,” said volunteer assistant coach Brandon Chapoton. “There were a lot of hills, and we don’t really see that on a regular basis.” Southeastern Louisiana at Crimson ClassicTUSCALOOSA, Ala. – The Southeastern Louisiana cross country teams competed in the annual Crimson Classic on Friday, hosted by the University of Alabama. Four members of the women’s team and five members of the men’s team made the trip to Tuscaloosa. “As a team I thought we did a good job,” said Gauson. “We had some adversity with Ryan Creech and Jan falling in the first mile. They got up and worked through the field. That had a big impact on our team finish, but to finish 29th in a field of that magnitude was pleasing. Sam had a fine individual performance and is now competing regularly at an elite level.” Wrozek was the top NSU woman finisher for the second time this season. Wilkins has led the Demons in each competition this fall. Sam Houston State at Crimson ClassicTUSCALOOSA, Ala. – The Sam Houston women placed 13th and the Bearkat men’s team was 14th in a talent-laden field of 24 universities at the University of Alabama Crimson Tide Classic cross country meet Friday. Freshmen Michael Perez (28:25.40) and Isaiah Gilbert (28:39.82) placed 160th and 167th respectively. The Islander women continue to improve with a 19th place finish at the Classic. Freshman Carissa Piñón paced the Islander women as she finished 92nd out of the 291 runners. She ran the 5k event in a time of 18:57.82, which was good enough for a new personal record. Following close behind was freshman Taylor Hawes (19:19.81) who finished 111th. Del Rio, Texas native Vanessa Galindo (19:27.17) took 120th in the event. Nathan Jones placed fifth with a 19:54.3 followed by a sixth place finish from Oliver James with a 19:56.7. Ryan Holroyd was eighth with a 20:19.9 and Brock Moreaux finished ninth at 20:23.5 as the Cowboys had six runners place in the top 10. After a two week break from competition, Southeastern cross country will compete in the Southland Conference Cross Country Championships in Natchitoches, La. on November 3rd.  This was very encouraging for us,” head coach Shawn Flanagan noted. “We’re getting close to Stephen F. Austin and we are looking good with two weeks left until conference.” Lamar at Adidas InvitationalLamar at Pre-National InvitationalTERRE HAUTE, Ind. – The Lamar Lady Cardinals cross country team scored 345 points to finish eighth at the Pre-Nationals meet Saturday in Terre Haute, Ind. Not only did Lamar finish among the nation’s elite at the race, but the Lady Cardinals also got a feel for the course where the 2014 Cross Country National Championships will be competed should they qualify. Jason Garcia and Justin Adame were the only other runners for the Islanders to finish better than 50th. Garcia ran 26:02.88 to finish 42nd while Adame placed 47th with a time of 26:10.90. Kiprono finished the four-mile race with a time of 19:51 and was edged out by three seconds for the gold by ULL’s Matt Rice. Bor was a step behind Kiprono and clocked a 19:51.6 to finish third. The Ragin’ Cajun Invitational was the last meet for Nicholls before they head to the Southland Conference Championships on Monday, Nov. 3 in Natchitoches, La. Senior Sam Stabler clocked a time of 24:12 to lead the Cardinals with a 34th-place finish at Wisconsin Adidas Invitational in Madison, Wis. Friday. Stabler was a bright spot for an LU squad that suffered some adversity when Ryan Creech and Jan Lukas Becker fell during the race. Stabler finished the race 44 seconds ahead of teammate Michael Kershaw (24:56/139th). Despite the fall, Creech was able to battle his back into the middle of the pack recording the team’s third fastest time (25:04). Junior Alex Dunbar was only seven seconds back of Creech placing 170th overall. Becker recovered from his fall to close out the team scoring for the Cardinals with a time of 25:20 (187th). Sophomores Edgar Martinez and Cesar Gonzalez finished back-to-back at 56th and 57th, respectively. Martinez finished with a time of 26:14.85 while Gonzalez finished at 26:15.73. Steven Galli placed 108th with a time of 26:59.92 while Daniel Guerrero (27:01.67) placed 111th. The NSU men tied for third with 98 points. McNeese won with 24, followed by UL-Lafayette (33), UNO (98, tied with NSU), Nicholls (135) and Southern (178). The Cowboys finished the event with a team score of 24 points followed by ULL with 33, New Orleans with 119, Northwestern State in fourth with 120 points, Nicholls at 164, Southern 213, and Louisiana College who did not record a team score. “I thought we had a really great day as a team,” said LU distance coach Darren Gauson. “To finish eighth and placing just behind #22 ranked Baylor was extremely pleasing and shows our consistent improvement as a group across the season.” On the women’s side, the Cowgirls placed second as a team with 46 points as ULL won the team title with 20 points. The SFA cross country teams will get more than two weeks off to recover from Friday’s race before they return to action on Monday, Nov. 3 for the Southland Conference Championships in Natchitoches, La. Senior Philipp Baar ran the best race of his career against some of the strongest competition this season at the Crimson Classic, placing fourth out of 261 runners with a new personal best of 25:03.82 in the 8k. – Return to top –last_img read more

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Sowetan Dialogues focus on the Bill of Rights

first_imgBotho Masigo; Folusho Mvubu; Advocate Pansy Tlakula; Lorraine Mofokeng from Sowetan; Advocate Lawrence Mushwana; Tiseke Kasambala; and Onke Dumeko from Brand SA (Image: Ray Maota)Brand South Africa, along with the Sowetan, hosted the Sowetan Dialogues in Mafikeng in the North West Province on 26 March 2014 at the Mmabatho Civic Centre.The Celebrating Human Rights Day: Does the Bill of Rights work for you? public dialogue was one in a six-part series aimed at promoting the pillars of South Africa’s National Development Plan, and promoting civic pride.The discussion was facilitated by Mafikeng FM radio personality, Botho Masigo, and the panel included: Lawrence Mushwana, a Supreme Court of South Africa advocate; Tiseke Kasambala, southern Africa director of Human Rights Watch; Advocate Pansy Tlakula, chairperson of the Independent Electoral Commission; and Folusho Mvubu, director of service delivery improvement support at the Department of Public Service and Administration.The discussion focused on how human rights, South Africa’s Bill of Rights, and traditional practices intersect.Human rights are moral principles that set out certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in national and international law.The Bill of Rights is a cornerstone of South Africa’s democracy, enshrining the rights of all people in the country and affirming the democratic values of human dignity, equality and freedom.RIGHTS MEET TRADITIONTlakula began her talk mentioning a case she dealt with in the late 1990s.“In the early days of democracy I was confronted with a case of a minor who was married off by her family from KwaZulu-Natal when she was 16 years old. She lived with the husband in Katlehong in the east of Johannesburg. We arrested the husband as well as the father of the girl and successfully prosecuted them,” said Tlakula.She cited the case to show how universal human rights would sometimes be at odds with traditional practices that have been practised for years, and described how this could have a negative impact on the person being protected.Tlakula said: “I was happy that we successfully protected a minor but this had a negative impact on her, as, when she turned 18 years old and could leave the place of protection we had kept her at, she had no place to go as she was ostracised from her village for getting her father arrested for a practice that had been going on for years.”Tlakula said that in trying to protect her human rights at all costs, they had displaced a young girl.SA AT THE FOREFRONT OF HUMAN RIGHTSKasambala said that through her work with Human Rights Watch, it was safe to say that South Africa was leading in human rights in Africa, but that it “should not relax”.“There are issues that need to be highlighted, for example police brutality, verbal attacks on media, attacks on differences of sexuality, as well as xenophobia,” she said.Kasambala said that to see if rights are being respected, one should look at local government for a start. She referred to a Human Rights Watch statement saying that “Despite South Africa’s strong constitutional protections for human rights and its relative success at providing basic services, the government is struggling to meet demands for economic and social rights. Financial mismanagement and corruption – especially at the local government level – have contributed to this issue.The killing of 34 miners at the Lonmin Platinum Mine in Marikana, North West Province, in August of 2012 shocked South Africans and highlighted increasing concerns over police brutality and underlying grievances over the government’s failure to fulfil basic economic and social rights. Bills have been proposed that, if enacted, would negatively affect media freedom and access to justice.”GET FAMILIAR WITH BILL OF RIGHTSMushwana said that citizens need to familiarise themselves with the Bill of Rights so they know exactly what to complain about; he talked about an incident in the rural town he comes from in Polokwane.“People need to familiarise themselves with the Bill of Rights because you cannot protect what you do not know,” Mushwana said.“For example, a town I come from in Polokwane called Lorraine had people protesting recently for them to get a mall. To tell the truth the town has less than 3000 people and not all have the buying power to make big business want to build a mall there.”Mushwana also talked about violent service delivery protests taking place in South Africa.“Those protesting need to protect the credibility of their protest by protecting it from external forces that sometimes join protests so they can commit crimes,” he said.Mushwana concluded, saying it was in the hands of every individual to make sure the Bill of Rights is adhered to and that no one’s rights are violated.last_img read more

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Fulton man arrested after police chase

first_imgA Fulton man has been arrested after Callaway County authorities say he led them on a long chase.Michael Rogers, 43, is accused of felony resisting arrest, driving while intoxicated, failure to yield to an emergency vehicle, and violation of an order of protection.Investigators say a deputy spotted Rogers late Saturday night on Old Highway 54 near East Elm Street in Auxvasse. Rogers allegedly got in his vehicle and drove away.Deputies say Rogers went across the median from eastbound to westbound Highway 54 at one point. Spike strips deployed just south of Auxvasse hit Rogers’ vehicle, finally getting it to stop.Rogers was taken into custody.last_img read more

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