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Broadway’s The Prom Will Launch a National Tour in 2021

first_imgBroadway’s ‘The Prom'(Photo: Deen van Meer) Make people see how the world could one day be! The popular Broadway musical The Prom, named Broadway.com’s 2018 Show of the Year and winner of the 2019 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Musical, will launch a national tour in Providence, RI, at the Providence Performing Arts Center, in February 2021. Exact dates and additional cities will be announced at a later date. Currently running at Broadway’s Longacre Theatre, The Prom is directed and choreographed by Tony winner Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mormon, Aladdin, Mean Girls) and features a book by Tony nominee Chad Beguelin (Aladdin) and Tony winner Bob Martin (The Drowsy Chaperone), music by Tony nominee Matthew Sklar (The Wedding Singer) and lyrics by Beguelin.In The Prom, when Broadway’s brassiest stars get word that a student is unceremoniously sidelined from a small-town Indiana prom—and that the press is involved—they gear up to save the day.The Broadway cast is led by Tony winner Beth Leavel, Tony nominee Brooks Ashmanskas, Tony nominee Caitlin Kinnunen, Tony nominee Christopher Sieber, Isabelle McCalla, Michael Potts, Angie Schworer, Josh Lamon and Courtenay Collins.In addition, Emmy-winning TV mastermind Ryan Murphy previously announced that he will adapt the celebrated musical into a movie for Netflix, which is expected to debut in September 2020. The full Broadway creative team will collaborate on the screen adaptation. Also, Penguin Young Readers’ Viking Children’s Books imprint will release a young adult novel adaptation of The Prom, written by Saundra Mitchell, on September 10. The Prom was nominated for six 2019 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Best Book of a Musical and Best Original Score. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 11, 2019 Related Showscenter_img The Prom View Commentslast_img read more

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Trademark monitoring’ company settles with Vermont attorney general over deceptive mailings

first_imgThe Vermont Attorney Generals Office has reached a settlement with Trademark Monitoring Services, Inc., California, for mailing solicitations to Vermont businesses that misrepresented that the businesses owed it money for trademark-related services. Under the settlement, TMS must comply strictly with Vermont and federal law regulating through-the mail offers, pay full refunds to the businesses that sent it money, and pay $10,000 to the State of Vermont in penalties and costs.The office of Vermont Attorney General William H. Sorrell has received a number of complaints from individuals and businesses concerning unauthorized billings by out-of-state companies. Billing people for things they didnt agree to buy is a violation of Vermont law, said Attorney General Sorrell, and we will take legal action against companies that engage in that practice.Because of an increase in this type of billing, the Vermont legislature has decided to make the violation of law more specific. Today the Senate takes up an amendment to Vermont law previously passed by the House of Representatives that outlines the requirements for sending solicitations so that they will not be mistaken for bills.TMS, whose offices are located at 355 South Grand Avenue, Room 2450, Los Angeles, California 90071, and whose Chief Executive Officer is Artem Basan, offers services such as monitoring trademarks and service mark registrations and searching for similar trademarks. The cost of these services ranged from $485 to $1,285 per year.TMS sent mailings to 18 Vermont businesses, resulting in payments by three of them, two of which stopped payment on their checks. In the absence of any evidence to the contrary, the Attorney General concluded that the TMS mailings misrepresented that businesses owed it money, by using language such as PROCESSING FEE â ¦ DUE NOW, PAST DUE NOTICE, Final Date for Payment, and YOU MUST PAY THE FULL AMOUNT DUE BY [DATE] TO AVOID ADDITIONAL PENALTIES AND LATE FEES.In addition, TMS mailings did not contain as prominent a disclaimer as is required by the United States Postal Service for through-the-mail solicitations that could reasonably be considered a bill, invoice or statement of account due.According to the Attorney General, these practices violated the Vermont Consumer Protection Acts prohibition on unfair and deceptive acts and practices in commerce.For more information on the settlement, call the Attorney Generals Office at (802) 828-5507.VAG 5.8.2013last_img read more

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Why Trump and Clinton Are America’s Most Disliked Presidential Candidates

first_imgFortune:As the Republican and Democratic national conventions draw near, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton find themselves among the most disliked presidential candidates in U.S. history. Americans have registered their negative views for the candidates in poll after poll, and their dissatisfaction runs deep. Why is the dislike for the leading presidential candidates so widespread? And is it possible to change voters’ opinions?…A good reputation, in contrast, requires not only doing good deeds, but also not doing bad deeds. People tend to judge immoral behaviors harshly and judge moral behaviors with skepticism, according to our study recently published in the journal Social Cognition.Read the whole story: Fortune More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Phil Miller fills group’s coffers

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Why preserving our past gives schemes a better future

first_imgChris Taylor, head of private markets at Hermes Investment ManagementThis is why we adopt a different approach with our big regeneration developments and see placemaking and community engagement as equally important to stable financial returns.We have a duty to deliver holistic returns for our clients that go far beyond the financial and consider the impact of our decisions on society, the environment and the wider world. Boasting a long history of developing assets that benefit local communities, we remain committed to creating places where people want to live, work and play.While recognising the importance of preserving each of our development sites’ unique history by creating desirable and community-focused assets, we also have a strong track record of implementing large regeneration projects with an eye to the future.What sets us apart from other institutional investors is our focus on ensuring that social and environmental factors are at the heart of a responsible and sustainable investment strategy. Source: PixabayOur commitment to sustaining long-term financial returns allows us to invest in assets that can have a positive societal and environmental impact. This affords the scope to create what we term a “meaningful city”, combining a sense of belonging for local communities and citizens, while creating the right environment for attracting and retaining talent and in turn securing global capital.Preserving historyA stellar example is NOMA in Manchester, one of the UK’s largest heritage-led regeneration projects, which is taking shape on the site where Sir Richard Arkwright opened Manchester’s first steam-powered cotton mill in the 1780s. Our dedication to the history of the site can be seen in the careful restoration of the Victorian buildings, through which we are saving the architectural lineage of post-industrial Britain for future generations.This is not the only example of our attempt to stay true to a site’s historical roots. The Paradise Birmingham development presented a unique opportunity to reclaim buildings lost to the barbarism of 1960s urban development. Key to this development is the civic pride established by our Victorian and Edwardian ancestors.Since 1945, a number of buildings have been shrouded in concrete. This project offered an opportunity to remove a host of undesirable buildings and create desirable public realm and greater accessibility. NOMA in Manchester is one of the UK’s largest heritage-led regeneration projectsThis approach is also visible at Wellington Place in Leeds, which contains one of the city’s biggest public spaces, with the historic Lifting Tower at its heart. Built in 1850, it was used to hoist wagons between the viaduct and ground-level goods yard when the old Central Station was still in use – today it stands as a lasting reminder of the city’s industrial past.All these assets reflect our investment strategy of building long-term value, which we believe can be achieved by becoming intimately involved with our developments and preserving links with the past. We remain committed to curating long relationships with not only the development managers across all our assets, but also the wider community which ultimately benefits from the projects.Simply deploying capital on its own into these developments is not an option if you are creating spaces where people want to work, live and play. By taking this approach, we are invested not only in a financial sense, but in the sense of the community, environment and wider society.last_img read more

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Plugging the leak

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Intellectual property

first_img (1) L’Oréal SA (2) Lancôme Parfums et Beauté and CIE (3) Laboratoire Garnier and CIE v (1) Bellure NV (2) Malaika Investments Ltd (T/A Honeypot Cosmetic and Perfumery Sales) (3) Starion International Ltd: CA (Civ Div) (Lords Justice Jacob, Wall, Rimer): 21 May 2010 Brand names – Comparative advertising – Infringement – Perfumes The court was required to determine issues of trademark law following a decision of the European Court of Justice. The appellants (D) had three ranges of products, each of which smelled like a famous, luxury-branded perfume known by a well-known registered trademark. The respondent (L) alleged that D’s use of comparison lists for each of their ranges of product, showing which products corresponded to which of L’s perfumes, infringed its registered trademarks for those perfumes. The evidence was that: D obtained a major promotional advantage from using such lists; neither customers nor ultimate consumers were deceived as a result of the use of the lists; neither the image nor the distinctiveness of the trademark for the comparable fine fragrance was impaired by the use of the lists; sales of the corresponding fine fragrance were not affected by the use of the lists. The issues for the court were whether, in the light of the judgment of the ECJ, the use of the registered marks on and in relation to the comparison lists fell within article 5(1)(a) of Directive 89/104 and whether that use did not infringe because it complied with Directive 84/450 on misleading and comparative advertising. It was not in dispute that, in the comparison lists relating to perfumes, D had used word marks registered by L and others and that use was made in respect of products which were identical with those in respect of which those marks were registered, namely perfumes. D submitted that the use of the word marks in the lists was merely descriptive. Held: (1) The decision of the ECJ was that in same mark/goods cases where the defendant claimed that his use was descriptive so as to take him outside article 5(1)(a) of the Trade Marks Directive he would only succeed if his use was ‘for purely descriptive purposes’. The word marks belonging to L and others were used in the comparison lists distributed by D not for purely descriptive purposes, but for the purpose of advertising. The ECJ had indicated that the use was within article 5(1)(a). According to the ECJ, the use went beyond ‘purely descriptive’ use because it was used for advertising, L’Oréal SA v Bellure NV (C-487/07) [2010] Bus LR 303 ECJ (1st Chamber) applied. (2) Even though the use fell within article 5(1)(a) it would not infringe if it complied with all the conditions set forth in article 3a(1) of the Comparative Advertising Directive. However, the decision of the ECJ was to the effect that saying, truthfully, that D’s product had an essential characteristic, in the instant case the smell, of the trademark owner’s product amounted to saying that the product was an ‘imitation or replica’ within paragraph (h) of article 3a(1), L’Oréal v Bellure applied. The ECJ further held that if a comparative advertisement failed to comply with paragraph (h) it also took unfair advantage of the mark within the meaning of paragraph (g). A use that was not permitted because the conditions of article 3a(1) were not complied with was regarded as unlawful by the ECJ. Failure to comply with the conditions meant the use was ‘without due cause’ and so not within the exception to infringement of article 6(1)(b) of the Trade Marks Directive because not ‘in accordance with honest practices’. (3) It was not necessary to decide whether there was also infringement of article 5(2) of the Trade Marks Directive. The ECJ had concluded that where a third party attempted, through the use of a sign similar to a mark with a reputation, to ride on the coat-tails of that mark, the advantage resulting from such use was to be considered an advantage that had been unfairly taken of the distinctive character or the repute of that mark. Thus there would also have been article 5(2) infringement. Judgment accordingly.center_img Roger Wyand QC, Tom Moody-Stuart (instructed by Field Fisher Waterhouse) for the appellants; Henry Carr QC, Jacqueline Reid (instructed by Baker & McKenzie) for the respondents.last_img read more

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Tanks move thanks to Britlift beam

first_imgThe project required the removal of a storage tank following a fire, as well as the temporary removal of undamaged tanks so that reconstruction of the fire-damaged area could commence.On completion, Edwards Lifting Services will again use its Britlift T50 6 m modular spreader beam to lift the undamaged tank back into place.Rob Edwards, managing director Edwards Lifting Services said “The tank weighed 15 tonnes and had two large lifting points on top,which were only suitable for a vertical lift, hence the need for a beam.Edwards highlighted the benefit of the T50’s modularity, which allows it to be easily stored and transported.Liam Botting, Britlift managing director claimed that the company’s modular spreader beams are among the lightest on the market, which means they are optimised for manual handling. “Each modular component that was supplied to Edwards Lifting Services weighed no more than 48 kg,” he said.Edwards Lifting Services used its own 35-tonne capacity crane, alongside a 300-tonne capacity crane from John Sutch Cranes, during the initial stages of the project.Britlift is a designer and manufacturer of below the hook lifting equipment such as spreader beams and frames; lifting beams and frames; as well as a supplier of load cells and pins, slings, and shackles.  www.britlift.comwww.edwardsliftingservices.co.ukwww.johnsutchcranes.co.uklast_img read more

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Stink bug regulations to take effect

first_imgThe seasonal measures apply togoods shipped between September 1, 2018 and April 30, 2019.In a customer announcement, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Ocean (WW Ocean) advised that cargo being shipped from certain countries will require pre-treatment prior to loading on vessels destined for Australia and New Zealand.According to the authorities, the shipper/cargo owner is responsible for ensuring that cargo destined for Australia and New Zealand is compliant with these requirements.WW Ocean says, as a carrier, it is obligated to ask for treatment certificates for shipments to Australia and New Zealand prior to avessel’s departure. Any cargo falling under the measures without providing certificate will not be accepted for shipment, adds WW Ocean.For more information about the countries affected by the new requirements, click here.www.2wglobal.comlast_img read more

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Haiti and IMF reach agreement on SMP

first_imgThe International Monetary Fund (IMF) says it has reached an agreement with Haiti on a Staff-Monitored Program (SMP) “following extensive discussions” in the French-speaking Caribbean Community (CARICOM) country.The Washington-based financial institution said that a team led by Chris Walker, IMF Mission Chief for Haiti, ended a weeklong visit to the country on Sunday and at the conclusion of the mission, Alejandro Werner, Director of the IMF’s Western Hemisphere Department, met with President Jovenel Moïse, the Minister of Economy and Finance, the Governor of the Central Bank and other senior officials to mark the accord and discuss Haiti’s development strategy and continuing engagement with the IMF.Werner later described the agreement as an “important sign of commitment to improving the living conditions and increasing the economic opportunities of the Haitian people.”IMF to play a leadership roleThe statement said that President Moïse shared his vision for development of Haiti and asked the IMF to play a leadership role in bringing together the country’s development partners to support his reform and development plans, including strengthening the social safety net.Walker said the accord was reached “following extensive discussions” and the Haitian government is committed to carry out economic and structural reforms to promote economic growth and stability, and alleviate poverty, in Haiti.International community welcome reformsHe said the international community and key donors welcome the government’s resolve to implement reforms to ensure sustainable and inclusive growth. “Under the SMP, fiscal policy will focus on mobilizing revenues and rationalizing current expenditure, to make room for critical public investment in infrastructure, health, education and social services. This will include measures to improve tax collection and efficiency, and to eliminate excessive subsidies, including on retail fuel.“Other reforms will focus on stemming the losses of the public electricity company (EDH), which in recent years have amounted to a sizeable portion of the public deficit, by improving the efficiency of billing, and by reforming contracting practices.“Fiscal reforms also aim to increase the transparency of public accounts. These reforms are to be accompanied by a substantial package of mitigating measures to protect the most vulnerable members of society,” Walker said.“IMF staff will work closely with the authorities to monitor progress in the implementation of their economic program. The IMF will also continue to provide technical assistance to support Haiti’s capacity-building efforts and structural reform agenda.”Walker said that the SMP is designed to help the authorities build a credible track record, and successful implementation of the program will catalyze critical flows from development partners as well as support a future request for an Extended Credit Facility (ECF) arrangement.last_img read more

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