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Raucous Red Star fans not a factor, says Wenger

first_imgArsenal are relishing the prospect of facing fervent Red Star Belgrade fans in the cauldron of their Rajko Mitic stadium when the two teams clash in the Europa League on Thursday, the Premier League club’s manager Arsene Wenger said.Dug in at the heart of a busy residential district in central Belgrade, the 56,000-seater stadium when filled with fervent home fans produces decibel levels able to intimidate even the most battle-hardened opponents.Yet Wenger was adamant his side would not buckle under pressure from the terraces.“The support for a team is always a positive impact and we have had to deal with that in every stadium in England,” the Frenchman told a news conference on Wednesday.“We also have a long experience in the Champions League so we are used to it.“But of course, we are in a country with a big football tradition and it has produced fantastic players in history. It’s a country with a tradition in other team sports too so we expect a game with a huge commitment from everybody.”Having missed out on Champions League qualification for the first time in two decades last season, Arsenal are sixth in the Premier League after eight games of the current campaign and face a battle to secure a berth in Europe’s elite club competition next term with a top-four domestic finish.Asked if he considered winning the Europa League an easier route into the Champions League next season, Wenger said: “I don’t know, but for us it’s a target (to play in the Champions League). It’s one of the routes but it’s not the only route for us.“It’s the first time in 20 years we’ve been in the Europa League so we are now discovering the level. For us it’s a potential trophy to win but we also want to do well in all the other competitions we are in.”Arsenal top Group I with a maximum six points from two games, two ahead of 1991 European Cup winners Red Star.It will be the first competitive meeting between the two sides since the 1978-79 UEFA Cup, the Europa League’s predecessor, when the Serbian club knocked Arsenal out in the third round with a 2-1 aggregate win.They lost to Borussia Monchengladbach in the final by the same aggregate score.last_img read more

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Campbell is staying at Arsenal, vows Wenger

first_imgArsenal boss Arsene Wenger has reiterated his desire to keep Joel Campbell at the club.The Costa Rican World Cup star has been attracting interest from a host of clubs this summer, with AC Milan the latest to be linked.Speculation has also grown around Campbell that he could be available for loan once again, having been so for the last three seasons.However, Wenger has now dismissed talk of the striker leaving and confirmed he plans to use him as part of his first-team squad.“I would like to keep him here, he has trained very well and matured a lot,” said Wenger. Joel Campbell 1last_img read more

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Ilkay Gundogan believes Man City could have scored MORE goals against Barcelona

first_img Ilkay Gundogan scored twice in Manchester City’s win over Barcelona Ilkay Gundogan believes Manchester City could have beaten Barcelona even more emphatically than they did on Tuesday.City came from behind – with Gundogan scoring twice – to record a famous 3-1 victory over the five-time European champions in the Champions League.Coming after losing to the same opponents 4-0 just a fortnight earlier in the Nou Camp it was a remarkable feat, yet it was not undeserved as Pep Guardiola’s men produced a highly impressive performance.Midfielder Gundogan said: “It was definitely a big win for us. For me, what was important was our performance in the second half after we equalised before half-time.“We did a very good job, we controlled Barcelona and had a few more chances to score goals. If we had taken them, maybe we could have won 4-1 or 5-1.“The performance was great, we can enjoy it now and be really happy. I hope we can take confidence from the spirit we showed.”The result got City back on course for a place in the last 16 and they can now complete the task with victory in their next Group C game at Borussia Monchengladbach later this month. They have also still got to play Celtic at home.Germany international Gundogan said: “It was quite an impressive win for us and maybe we did not expect that, especially the way we played, but it’s just a win.“It’s three points, of course a very important three points, but it’s not worth more than a win against Borussia Monchengladbach.“We know there are two more games to go. We have a game in Germany which we know will not be easy against a really good team. The group stage is not over yet.” 1last_img read more

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Rodgers hopes Griffiths can win Rosenborg fitness race

first_imgBrendan Rodgers is hopeful Leigh Griffiths will win his fitness battle and lead the line for Celtic in their Champions League qualifier against Rosenborg.The Scottish champions were forced to play without a recognised centre forward in their 0-0 draw with the Norwegians in Glasgow with Moussa Dembele out through injury while Griffiths was suspended.Attacking midfield Tom Rogic was Celtic’s leading attacker on the night but it was the visitors who created the better chances.Scotland international Griffiths is also carrying a calf knock but Rodgers believes the 26-year-old can feature in Trondheim. Asked about Griffiths’ availability, he said: “Hopeful. We will see where he is at the weekend. “Even if he was available for this game he couldn’t have played, with a calf strain. “We we will see how he is over the next few days leading into next week. “Of course it is (a concern) if you haven’t got strikers. But I can’t worry about it so much. I want to focus on finding a way to get a result so I will look at it going forward.  “I thought Tom did very well. Of course he wasn’t quite playing as a striker, we played him just off in a withdrawn role. “I thought at times our general play was very good, it was just that bit round the edge of the box where, when you have natural strikers, they manipulate the ball to get a shot in and they are a reference to the team to bounce the ball off. “So maybe we missed that link in the final sector.”last_img read more

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Marshfield girls basketball slides past Eau Claire North in second half

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterEAU CLAIRE — Marshfield shot just 27 percent from the field but made 19 of 25 free throws and forced 18 turnovers as it defeated Eau Claire North 48-33 in a nonconference girls basketball game Tuesday night at Eau Claire North High School.Ema Fehrenbach led the Tigers (13-4) with 15 points and eight rebounds and made 7 of 10 free throws.McKayla Scheuer added 12 points and four steals, and Caitlin Michaelis had 10 points and seven rebounds for Marshfield.The Tigers trailed 13-9 after the first quarter and 18-17 at halftime before outscoring North (9-6) 31-15 in the second half.Marshfield plays at Stevens Point as part of a girls-boys Wisconsin Valley Conference doubleheader on Friday. The girls game starts at 6 p.m. with the boys game to follow at 7:45 p.m. Both games will be broadcast on WDLB-AM 1450 and wdlbwosq.com.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Tigers 48, Huskies 33Marshfield 9 8 16 15 – 48Eau Claire North 13 5 9 16 – 33MARSHFIELD (48): McKayla Scheuer 3-8 4-5 12, Caitlin Michaelis 2-12 5-6 10, Natalie Zuelke 0-3 0-0 0, Martha Kupfer 0-1 0-0 0, Ellie Kummer 2-11 3-4 7, Ema Fehrenbach 4-8 7-10 15, Hannah Meverden 2-4 0-0 4. FG: 13-47. FT: 19-25. 3-pointers: 3-15 (Scheuer 2-6, Michaelis 1-6, Kummer 0-3). Rebounds: 31 (Fehrenbach 8, Meverden 7, Michaelis 7). Turnovers: 10. Fouls: 6. Fouled out: none. Record: 13-4.EAU CLAIRE NORTH (33): Carcyn Wathke 0-1 0-0 0, Mariah Kent 1-2 0-0 2, Mattea Peplinski 1-5 0-0 2, 12 1-2 0-0 2, Brianna Banks 1-8 0-0 2, Emma Fischer 0-1 0-0 0, Kylea Davis 0-3 0-0 0, Alaina Quaranta 6-14 1-2 15, Nikki Kilboten 5-6 0-0 10, Markeysha Hazelton 0-6 0-0 0. FG: 15-48. FT: 1-2. 3-pointers: 2-11 (Quaranta 2-4, Peplinski 0-1, 12 0-1, Fischer 0-1, Banks 0-4). Rebounds: 29 (Kilboten 10). Turnovers: 18. Fouls: 16. Fouled out: none. Record: 9-6.last_img read more

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Colby Hornet girls grab win at Columbus

first_imgBy Hub City Times staffMARSHFIELD – The Colby Hornet girls basketball team grabbed a healthy, 26-14, lead by halftime of the Nov. 20 matchup with the Columbus Dons in Marshfield. The Hornets were able to maintain that lead through the second half, grabbing a 54-34 win against the Dons.Columbus freshman Dorci Walker and junior Addie Baierl were leading scorers for Columbus, with eight each. Senior Maren Seefluth followed with seven.Senior Ashley Streveler scored 19 for the Hornets, netting five 3-pointers in the game. Senior Vanessa Lopez was second for Colby, with 10.last_img read more

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South Africa takes to space

first_imgSouth Africa’s Sumbandila satellite undergoing vacuum chamber tests at Houwteq, the Denel Aerospace Division facility near Grabouw in the Western Cape. (Image: SunSpace) The SunSpace pioneers: CEO Bart Cilliers, executive chairperson Themba Vilakazi, and Ron Olivier. (Image: SunSpace) Small machine, big technology: the Sumbandila satellite. (Image: SunSpace)Jennifer SternAt the rate technology develops, the impossible becomes possible, the improbable happens daily, and things which were once the province of the technical elite become commonplace.Take satellites, for example. The Russians launched Sputnik, the first satellite, into earth orbit only 50 years ago, but now there are more than 25 000 satellites estimated to be circling the globe – some 16 000 of them inoperative space junk.And – here is the surprising part – not all of those were built by big government programmes with multibillion-dollar budgets. Three of those little specks of matter up there were made in a small laboratory outside Cape Town.It all started in 1992 when Garth Milne, Jan du Plessis, Sias Mostert and the late Arnold Schoonwinkel of Stellenbosch University’s Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering initiated a postgraduate programme to build a satellite.Using a modular construction designed by Surrey Satellite Systems Technology (SSTL) and spending the modest sum of about R11-million (US$1.4-million) over seven years, the student group produced their first satellite in 1999. It was called Sunsat – a contraction of Stellenbosch University satellite.Off-the-shelf componentsWhereas most satellites are usually manufactured from specially designed and built components by companies well entrenched in the space programme, SSTL set out to prove that it was possible to build a satellite from commercially available off-the-shelf components. And Stellenbosch piggybacked on their findings.As with many great endeavours, the first thing most people ask is “Why?” In the case of Sunsat, the answer is not the usual “Because we can,” but the more accurate “To prove we can” – and to prove it without access to the specialised technology that is the preserve of the space programme elites. An equally important aim was to train students in satellite technology, because there’s no better way to learn than to do.Building it was the main objective, but it would always have had a cloud hanging over it (instead of the other way round) if it never got to fly. So the Sunsat group were delighted to get a payload from Nasa – flying a magnetometer and GPS testing programme. With the help of the Hermanus Magnetic Observatory about an hour east of Cape Town, the Sunsat team designed a magnetometer that could fit inside the tiny 600mm by 600mm by 900mm satellite.On 23 February 1999 the 64kg satellite was loaded aboard an American-designed Delta 7926 rocket launcher at Van den Bergh Air Force Base in the US, and blasted into a low level sun-synchronous orbit.Nasa worked out that they needed six months to collect sufficient data for their purposes, and estimated that Sunsat would keep going for about 11 months, so they figured they were safe. But they got more than they bargained for. Sunsat just missed being functional for its second birthday, being bashed out of its orbit by a rogue bit of rocket booster on 22 January 2000.Nasa got a bargain. And so did Sunsat, as launching satellites is not exactly cheap, at about $25 000 (R205 100) per kilogram. Luckily, Nasa picked up the tab on this one.So Sunsat was an unmitigated success. It flew, it did its job, and it lasted more than twice as long as predicted. More importantly, it contributed immensely to the development of high-tech expertise, its main purpose.Going commercialBut a good thing tends to generate an energy all of its own. After Sunsat’s successful launch, the team was approached in 2000 by a party who, for business and strategic reasons, remains nameless. The client was looking for a platform for “earth imaging remote sensing equipment” –  satellite imagery, in English.This created a conflict, as the team was part of the university, set up to do research and teaching – not to fulfil commercial contracts for foreign customers. So they started a company called SunSpace, and moved off campus to Techno Park, a few kilometres down the road. This satellite was much bigger than Sunsat, weighing in at about 200kg.Construction was started in late 2000, and it was delivered in March 2003, but only launched in May 2007. It is still floating about up there, taking photographs of the earth. Even before this satellite was delivered, the client ordered another higher-spec one, which is already under construction. When completed, this will be the fourth satellite built by the group that is now SunSpace.The pathfinderIf you’ve been counting, you’ll notice there is a gap. The third satellite, which is called Sumbandila, was built for the South African government. The name is a Venda word that means “clear the way” or “pathfinder.”Ordered in December 2005, the completed satellite was delivered in December 2006, taking only 12 months to build. It was to be launched from a Russian submarine in the Bering Sea in late December 2006 or early January 2007. But that didn’t happen, and Sumbandila remains sadly earthbound – a depressing state of affairs for an ambitious satellite. And ambitious this project is. It was designed to carry a payload of sophisticated remote sensing equipment that would be dedicated to imaging southern Africa.There’s an interesting aside to this technology. Communications satellites are in a geostationary orbit, with thrusters constantly keeping them in the same position above the earth. Earth orbit satellites like Sunsat and Sumbandila, on the other hand, actually orbit the earth, with the force of gravity maintaining their positions. They only need to use their thrusters (if they have any) to make small adjustments.These orbits are determined by the job the satellites have to do. Sumbandila is intended to take satellite images of southern Africa. When it is finally launched, it will be put into an orbit that takes it over that part of the world at a convenient 10am, about the best time for high-level imaging.So of the three satellites SunSpace has so far built, one is still on earth, waiting for its chance to shine, one is busy sending earth images to its anonymous owner, and one is still up there, but not operational. It’s what some people might call space debris but let’s rather think of it as a permanent orbiting monument to African ingenuity and technological progress.In the words of Ron Olivier, business manager of SunSpace, “I look forward to the day an African astronaut is launched on board an African spacecraft launched on an African rocket from the African continent.’ Big dreams, but 20 years ago, who would have thought there’d be a South African-designed satellite orbiting above our heads?Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at marya@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesGoogle to put Africa onlineSouth Africa’s aerospace industry takes offAfrican eyes on the universeUseful linksSunSpaceUniversity of Stellenbosch Hermanus Magnetic ObservatorySouth African Space Portallast_img read more

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Motshekga: We need the public’s help

first_imgThe strike has brought education across the country to a halt and has forced several provincial education departments to postpone preliminary matric examinations. Preliminary examinations are considered to be crucial dry-runs for the final examinations.The department is setting up learning centres for grade 12 learners to complete the syllabus and also start revision work. Motshekga’s call is directed mainly at those who have expertise in all subjects offered to matric learners. She said the department would provide the necessary learning materials to the designated centres across the country.The department has also roped in other partners such as SABC Education and the International Marketing Council to make available both study and revision materials for grade 12s and learning materials for younger learners.Motshekga said by mobilising qualified professionals and subject experts, the department is strengthening the efforts of grade 12 learners who have formed their own study groups during the strike. “It is important that grade 12s remain focused during this time,” said Motshekga.Grade 12 learners are also encouraged to listen to daily broadcasts on the SABC Education radio stations and television channels. They may also access past examination papers and study guides from the department’s website.She also called for parents, communities, retired and student teachers to volunteer and find creative ways of keeping younger learners occupied through various learning and enrichment programmes.Learner support materials are available on the department’s website: www.education.gov.za and the Thutong portal.People wishing to volunteer their services may contact the department’s Call Centre on: 0800 202 933 or email classof2010@dbe.gov.za and submit their details. The public is also encouraged to visit the Department’s Facebook page at www.groups.to/dbevolunteerslast_img read more

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Lucy home after 5-year US tour

first_imgMalapa Hominin 1 (left), Lucy (centre) and Malapa Hominin 2 (right), showing the difference in height between A. sediba and A. afarensis. (Image: Lee Berger, Wits University) A reconstruction of what Lucy might have looked like, by award-winning palaeoartist Elisabeth Daynes.(Image: Atelier Daynes) The Hadar region in Ethiopia, where Lucy was found. Family tree showing the existing hominoids: humans (genus Homo), chimpanzees and bonobos (genus Pan), gorillas (genus Gorilla), orangutans (genus Pongo), and gibbons (four genera of the family Hylobatidae: Hylobates, Hoolock, Nomascus, and Symphalangus). All except gibbons are hominids.(Images: Wikipedia) MEDIA CONTACTS • National Museum of Ethiopia  +251 11 111 7150 RELATED ARTICLES • New fox species found at Malapa • A new boost for an old science • SA unearths new human ancestor • Fossils tell the mammal story • Maropeng top evotourism destinationJanine ErasmusEthiopia’s grand old lady Lucy – the 3.2-million-year-old fossil discovered in 1974 – has come home after touring the US for the last five years. Her return was enthusiastically celebrated by her compatriots, who consider her an icon of human evolution.Lucy is a specimen of the hominid species Australopithecus afarensis, which walked the earth between 3.9-million and 2.9-million years ago. South Africa’s A. sediba, which lived about two-million years ago, is thought to possibly be a link between Lucy’s species and our own.Taxonomically, hominids, or Hominidae, belong to a family of primates, which include four living genera, namely humans; gorillas; orangutans; and chimpanzees and bonobos. Australopithecus is one of the extinct genera in the family. One of the notable characteristics of the family is the ability to walk upright.Fossils belonging to A. afarensis have only ever been found in North Africa, and Lucy is no exception – she was unearthed at Hadar, a village in the Awash Valley in Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle. This is the origin of her species name. She is also known by her catalogue name of AL 288-1, signifying Afar Locality, the site’s number, and the first fossil discovered there.This region is known for its wealth of archaeological finds; they include the Gawis cranium, most of the top of the skull of what scientists believe to be a human ancestor from the Middle Pleistocene period (about 781-thousand to 126-thousand years ago). It also encompasses the Gona river, where stone tools dating back 2.6-million years were found between 1992 and 1994.Throwing off Ethiopia’s negative imageThe US trip marked the first time that Lucy, known locally as Dinknesh (“special” or “wonderful” in Amharic), had left her home country. Before the jet-setting fossil went abroad, she had been stored in a special vault at the National Museum in Addis Ababa.The tour was titled Lucy’s Legacy: The Hidden Treasures of Ethiopia, and it featured over 140 other cultural and religious artefacts, both ancient and modern.Although she was accompanied by a team of scientists and security personnel, there was some opposition to the initiative, mainly because of fear that Lucy would be damaged. One of the objectors was National Museum researcher Berhane Asfaw, who was quoted as saying that he was the first to object and even though she’s returned he still is not convinced it was necessary to send Lucy away.The tour took in 11 US cities, including Houston, Seattle, New York, and Austin.A portion of the tour’s proceeds, said to be around US$1.5-million (R14.3-million), was allocated to the museum to help it upgrade its research facilities. The tour was also aimed at raising Ethiopia’s profile as a tourism and science destination.Breakthrough discoveryLucy was discovered on 24 November 1974 by US paleoanthropologist Donald Johansen and graduate student Tom Gray, while the two were mapping the area. A white bone caught their attention, and one glance told them it was a hominid ulna – a bone from the forearm. Investigating further, they found more fragments, and eventually managed to collect 40% of the skeleton, including a lower jaw, skull and pelvis. Because none of the bones and bone fragments were duplicated, the team realised they had come across the remains of a single person.Her informal name comes from the famous Beatles’ song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”, played over and over by the team during their celebrations just after the find.She is thought to be a female because of the width of her pelvic opening, and because her size is consistent with the trend seen at Hadar of males being bigger and females being smaller – Lucy is a little lady. While alive she stood about 105cm tall and weighed just 29kg. Physically, she looked similar to a chimpanzee, with an ape-sized brain too.Although her species was able to live in trees, Lucy’s petite skeleton also shows evidence that she walked upright – her knee cap has a prominent lip which prevents it from slipping out of position as weight shifts from leg to leg during walking, and the surfaces of her knee joint are adapted to the extra weight they need to carry in the upright position. Also, Lucy’s pelvis and vertebrae show typical adaptations, such as a spinal curve, needed to cope with a permanent upright stance.Her humerus (upper arm) to femur (upper leg) ratio is 84.6%, a figure obtained by dividing the length of the humerus by the length of the femur and multiplying by 100. In contrast, this figure is 97.8% for chimps, indicating long arms for climbing trees, and 71.8% for modern humans. Lucy’s dimensions indicate that either her legs were lengthening, or her arms were getting shorter, or both.The researchers are of the opinion that Lucy was a vegetarian. They found no clues as to the manner of her death, as her bones showed no signs of damage from scavengers. Lucy was already an adult when she died, because her cranial bones had fused and her wisdom teeth – the third pair of molars – had emerged and were slightly worn.According to Johansen, Lucy is important not because she’s the oldest or best-preserved fossil – she is neither – but because her species is located on the human family tree at a “pivotal point”. At that time there was a split leading to the development of two branches – one leading to the human genus Homo, and one that died out.Until just a few years ago Lucy was the oldest hominid fossil known. The discovery in 1994 of Ardi, a female of the early human-like species Ardipithecus ramidus, eclipsed even Lucy, as the newcomer was estimated to be about 4.4-million years old.last_img read more

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As The Sun Sets on MySpace – Who Will Beat Facebook?

first_imgRelated Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Analysis#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… marshall kirkpatrick The year was 2013. Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg was still the social network’s public persona, but he had a young family and new-found loves of world travel, exotic regional cocktails and faux-native art. Facebook had become overgrown with spammy apps and awkwardly targeted advertisements. The company quietly gave Zuckerberg a huge salary to pursue those other interests and leave product development and the business in the hands of other people. There was no denying it – Facebook was on the decline as Social Network XYZ rose to global social networking supremacy. But what in this future scenario will Social Network XYZ be? As the sands of time wash MySpace into obscurity, with a wave of hundreds of employees being let go this week for example, now seems like a good time to think about what comes next. What could kill Facebook, the MySpace killer? We’ve identified four possible scenarios – which do you think is most likely? Most desirable?After these four scenarios, we’ve got a poll asking readers what you’d most like to see come next.Scenario 1: Incremental ChangeIn some ways, Facebook was just a series of incremental changes away from what MySpace offered. The same core functionality of messaging, media storage and personal expression is consistent across both sites – Facebook just purports to be classier, it’s more about school friends than music and it came along at a time when being online was more universal than it was in the days of MySpace’s rule. Perhaps another social network will challenge Facebook simply by making small changes in response to the most annoying things about Facebook. Perhaps they will more effectively deal with app spam and they will make preservation of privacy easier. It’s about to get a whole lot harder at Facebook, if you believe Michael Arrington’s report that Facebook status messages will soon be publicly visible by default. Facebook’s privacy settings are already so labyrinthine that company watch-dog blogger Nick O’Neill’s post on changing the settings has been viewed by millions of people and he’s now selling a book on the topic. Perhaps a challenger will make incremental changes to these kinds of policies and steal Facebook’s thunder.Scenario 2: A Smarter TechnologyFacebook’s technology is very smart already, but it could be a whole lot smarter. The future of social networking may come in the form of more sophisticated recommendations. If you liked this video that your friend just shared, then you might also like these other videos, these groups and these public figures to follow.The Facebook news feed keeps users engaged by following the progress of their friends’ lives – but most peoples’ friends have pretty boring lives. The flow of information we get from our social networks could be spiced up a whole lot with smarter recommendation systems. Unfortunately Facebook is moving away from the kind of rich user profiles and connections that sophisticated recommendations are built on. The company is removing geographic regional networks and no longer prompts users to note how they met the people they connect with on Facebook. (Its executives also speak to their users like children, in big vague terms like “we help you Connect.”)The future crown of social networking could be stolen by a system that offers users powerful features, options and recommendations. Think of how television is moving towards increased complexity of features and imagine social networking going that way as well.Scenario 3: Augmented RealityAugmented reality is one of those new buzz words that is going to get old fast, but the user experience is not. Social networking as a layer on top of real world experiences has a lot of potential to capture peoples’ imaginations. Systems like Loopt and FourSquare are already catching on.Why would I want to leave my network at home on my desktop when I could bring it with me and detect a residue of restaurant reviews written by my friends, wherever I go around town. Is this place I’m in just a fountain in the park, or can I click a button on my phone and see pictures of my friends smiling there in the past, read a short history of when it was built and leave messages for friends who come there in the future? On second thought, if you thought information overload was an issue today, an augmented future like that could drive us all even more insane.Scenario 4: Distributed Social NetworkingImagine being an AT&T customer and being unable to call T-Mobile customers on your phone. Imagine being afraid to leave your phone provider because you’d lose your friends’ numbers you’d stored and the photos you’d taken. (Heck, imagine having a great phone but being unable to use it on another network! But that’s another story…)That’s where we’re at with social networking today. They are essentially “walled gardens” little different from the old AOL days. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Talking Social Network Interop @ GSP East from Brian Oberkirch on Vimeo.There are people working to change that. Check out the DiSo (Distributed Social Networking) Project. Check out the writing of Marc Canter, a man on a quest against user lock-in.The next step after Facebook may be no social network in particular at all – it may be social networking as a protocol. A set of standards that let you message, share with and travel to any social network you choose. Suddenly all the social networks have to improve because they are competing on quality of service, over customers that have free will and are able to leave at any time. Someone might even build an interoperable social networking service so compelling that you’d be willing to pay for it, instead of being served up ads.This is probably the most radical vision, the riskiest when it comes to making money, and so the least likely to happen. But it sure does sound interesting.What do you think the future of social networking is going to look like? Facebook can’t rule the world forever. No one can. The marketplace and the internet are all about churn, innovation and cycles. Just like MySpace has fallen from the top, someday Facebook will too. What do you want to see come next?last_img read more

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